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Why is Tesla’s DMV investigation so slow?

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It’s been a year since the California Department of Automobiles opened an investigation into Tesla’s sales offering of the fully self-driving feature, the $12,000 software package that supposedly enables a Tesla to drive itself through city and neighborhood streets.

It’s been nearly six months since the agency, under pressure from the state Senate Transportation Committee, opened an investigation into safety issues related to fully autonomous driving.

What did those investigations result in?

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DMV will not say.

When might the results be public?

DMV will not say.

Why does it take so long?

DMV will not say.

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For Transportation Committee Chairwoman Lena Gonzalez (De Long Beach), it’s too late to answer.

“Senator Gonzalez has well informed the DMV of her dissatisfaction with the lack of action on this critical public safety issue,” the legislature’s media spokesperson said in an email Wednesday to The Times.

The email said the senator had asked the DMV to set a timeline, but “the DMV has made clear that there is no timeline and no expected end date for the investigation.”

Gonzalez is considering a legislative hearing on the issue. Her office said there is no hearing planned for now, “but that may change as we continue to monitor the progress of the investigation.”

“The review is ongoing and we will contact you when it is complete,” DMV told The Times.

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The Internet is full of videos of the erratic and dangerous behavior of fully autonomous cars. May 12 Tesla Crash in Newport Beach The car that killed all three occupants of the car and injured several construction workers, is being investigated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in part to see if an autopilot or fully self-driving Tesla engaged before or during the accident.

A DMV investigation is looking into whether Tesla is deceptively marketing the robot car feature by using the term Full Self-Driving Capability on its online application form and elsewhere on its website. State regulations Banning car makers from using marketing language to suggest that a car is capable of self-driving when it is not. This investigation began in May 2021.

The DMV investigation into the issues raised by Gonzalez is heading into its sixth month with no end in sight. Gonzalez asked the DMV to “evaluate the FSD pilot trials,” for information on how DMV would handle the situation if it deemed full self-driving to be unsafe, and whether there was a risk to the public.

Last year, The Times sought an interview with DMV President Steve Gordon, a former Silicon Valley CEO, but his media relations team fell back each time. Gordon declined similar requests from other media outlets as well. The Times asked to speak with Governor Gavin Newsom or his designee about why his administration has not discussed the matter. Governor’s staff directed the question to the DMV.

Meanwhile, accidents continue.

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is currently investigating 42 accidents involving automated driving systems controlled by robots. Of those, 35 are from Tesla and seven are from other automakers.

Tesla sells a complete self-driving system with a growing list of features Since 2016. In recent years, it has worked to increase the number of people you allow to use its “beta” version. In the Silicon Valley parlance, beta means a program that works but may contain bugs and is not ready for widespread public release.

On YouTube, Tesla customers testing technology on public roads continue Post videos which are shown to quickly veer into oncoming traffic through double yellow lines, fail to stop for semi-trucks swerving in front of vehicles, head toward metal posts and pedestrians, and much more.

In compliance with DMV regulations, companies such as Waymo, Cruise, Argo, Motional and Zoox have used professionally trained test drivers as a safety backup while testing their self-driving systems. Companies report all malfunctions to the DMV as well as report what is known as “disengagement,” the moments when a robot system fails or encounters a situation that requires human intervention from the driver.

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Exempting Tesla from those regulations is a matter of meta-analysis by the DMV. The agency said, through public documentation and previous statements by its media relations division, that fully autonomous driving is a driver assistance system, not a standalone system.

Gordon told Gonzalez in a five-page letter in January that the feature is “beyond the scope of the DMV regulations for autonomous vehicles” because it requires a human operator. He noted that DMV regulations only apply to fully self-driving cars, but said the agency would apply “Re-visit” this situation.

In defending the position to Gonzalez and others, DMV officials cited advisory work conducted on behalf of the agency by California Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology at UC Berkeley, or PATH.

But Stephen E. Schladover, a research engineer at PATH, said the group’s work with the DMV was purely technical, and focused on the capability of the automated system.

“We are not legal experts,” he said in a phone interview. “That was just a research support contract to provide technical advice along the way.”

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Tesla has made clear that its “design intent” for fully autonomous driving is self-driving, Schladover said, and he believes the company’s use of the term is “very harmful to everyone in the world.” [autonomous vehicle] industry, as it would give the whole industry a black eye”, given the incomplete “experimental” state of its technology.

Schladover said he’d like to see more oversight at the state and national level — and he didn’t pull any punches. “This is the job of the NHTSA at the federal level,” he said. “I’d like to see NHTSA trample them.”

Automated car law expert Bryant Walker Smith at the University of South Carolina has spoken and written extensively about the ambiguous nature of the DMV rules, designed with language that lends itself to exploiting a “linguistic gap.” “Tesla’s use of ‘FSD’ is very misleading,” he wrote In a December article for the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society.

His article noted that the Society of Automotive Engineers, whose definitions of vehicle autonomy are used extensively by regulators, states in official documents that it is “wrong” to assume that the system is not autonomous because test vehicles require human drivers.

Smith notes that Elon Musk has often stated publicly that full autonomy for Tesla cars is imminent, so fully autonomous driving is being tested as a fully driverless system, and therefore must be subject to the same DMV regulations as all other companies.

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Is the DMV any closer to adopting this position than it was five months ago?

DMV will not say.



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Editorial: Do you think Big Tech’s thousands of layoffs signal an upcoming recession? Think again

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Amazon Lay off More than 18,000 workers. Salesforce is shed 8,000, and Twitter gave up thousands more.

While we should never underestimate the hardships of people facing unexpected layoffs, these announcements from big tech companies are not a full-scale tragedy for the American economy. What would be very bad is if we see a significant slowdown in the economy, which leads to more layoffs by companies large and small in a variety of sectors.

While job losses can be painful for workers, especially from long-term positions, the reality is that large-scale layoffs in tech are just a small blip on the American job market, with 160 million workers. In a strong job market, like the one we’re in right now, it’s close 1.4 million workers They are fired or laid off from their jobs in an average month. else 4 million Quit their jobs voluntarily. with more than 6 million workers When hiring each month, most of those who lose their jobs can count on relatively short periods of unemployment.

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This is consistent with data on the length of time workers spend in a state of unemployment. The latest reports from December showed that the typical period of unemployment was less than Nine weeks.

Not working for nine weeks may still be a major hardship, but recently laid-off workers will be eligible for unemployment benefits, which are just around the corner. 40% of wages in most countries. Higher-paid workers, who would include most of the technology sector workers facing layoffs now, are also likely to get some savings to help them get through a period of unemployment.

Workers laid off by tech giants are also likely to be rehired more quickly than people in other sectors. the Unemployment rate In the information industry it was just 2.2% in December, compared to 3.5% overall.

But if our economy slows, and layoffs extend to other industries and business sizes, we could face the recession risks many economists fear from the Fed’s rate hikes. They are clearly designed to slow the economy and reduce employment. The rationale is that the economy was seeing too much demand, which drove up wages and prices.

The price increase aims to reduce the demand for housing, cars and other things. This would reduce the number of jobs in the hardest-hit industries, reduce workers’ bargaining power and lead to smaller wage increases and less upward pressure on costs and prices.

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If this push to slow the economy goes too far, we will see a very different picture in terms of layoffs and resignations, as well as prospects for rehiring workers. In the strong job market we see today, layoffs outnumber layoffs nearly 3 to 1. In 2009, during the Great Recession, more people laid off – laid off temporarily It was almost 20% higher than the number of people leaving their jobs each month.

It was understandable that few people wanted to quit their jobs during the Great Recession. The prospect of finding new jobs was not very good. the typical period Unemployment extended to nearly 20 weeks by the beginning of 2010. Furthermore, many workers ended a period of unemployment by simply giving up their job search, rather than becoming employed. This was a terrible period for the tens of millions of workers who have been unemployed for periods of time and for those who care deeply about losing their jobs.

While this is very different from the job market we face today, where unemployment is at its lowest level in more than half a century, economists worry about the Fed’s interest rate hikes going too far and triggering another recession. The Fed is right to try to slow inflation, which is out of control at the end of 2021 and the early part of 2022. The housing market in particular has been seeing double-digit inflation.

The rate hikes have turned the picture in the housing market, as prices have stopped rising and are now falling in many parts of the country. The supply chain problems that drove price increases earlier in the recovery are largely gone, and prices for items like appliances and furniture are now coming down.

This is a great success story for the Federal Reserve. However, if it raised rates too high, leading to another recession, reports of widespread layoffs in tech — or in any sector — would be much worse news than they are today.

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Dean Baker is chief economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research. He is the author of several books including Forged: How Globalization and the Rules of Modern Economics Were Structured to Make the Rich Richer.

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Screenshots made by an AI director from a fake movie rage Twitter

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Scofield soon realizes that he is not alone. A small cadre of movie-obsessed artists and artists have harnessed the power of generative AI tools to reimagine classic films – or create entirely new ones – from some of the world’s most iconic names. In December, creator Johnny Darrell went viral Jodorowsky You see, a reimagining of the classic film under the eyes of groundbreaking director Alejandro Jodorowski. Inspired by Darrell, Washington-based Rob Sheridan, former art director of Nine Inch Nails, used artificial intelligence to create Jodorowsky Fraser.

Sheridan, 42, calls this AI-powered movement “The New Unreal.” Practitioners include a painter based in New Zealand Create a western space on Instagram and a sculptor from Austin, Texas, Making fake sci-fi TV shows. Another content creator from India is using AI image generators to create his own rich font Sci-fi with a Southeast Asian flavor.

“We’re starting to see this technology as something like a dream engine, leveraging a kind of distorted visual awareness to explore things that never were, never will be, never could be,” Sheridan said. “They hit you in a weird way, because they feel like They are very reasonable.”

Scofield said he didn’t know why his Cronenberg business was catching fire so quickly. He’s posted several previous experiments on Imgur, Reddit, and Twitter, all of which only got between 50 and 100 likes. “The intention was not to create a clickbait site, but I think it turned into that,” he said. “A lot of people were reposting it and saying, This is terrible. This man does not understand Cronenberg at all.Each time they did, it spread further and incited another wave of criticism, which incited another, and another, and another.

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Schoefield said the text of his tweet — simply “David Cronenberg’s Galaxy of Flesh (1985)” — could give the false impression that he was trying to deceive Twitter. “There is no real intent behind this title yet, Oh yeah, looks like that could be it,” he said. “But he seemed to really impress people, and I think someone like Cronenberg might be famous enough to have a fanbase.

He continued, “There are a lot of people who have opinions about what Cronenberg’s aesthetics are and what they are not, and what a bad interpretation of his style is.” He fears that people will think he is trying to reduce Cronenberg’s work to mere physical horror.

The frames themselves were created by giving Midjourney a “DVD screen” prompt of various scenes from the film The empire strikes. Then it was like: Everything is made of skin, joints, tendons, nerves, umbilical cords, stomach, and arteriesSchofield added.

Getting a photo creator to make blood was hard — like getting Cronenberg style. “You can’t even write ‘Cronenberg’ in Midjourney,” Scofield said. (Sheridan thinks it’s because of him: He made a series of Cronenberg-inspired photos for the Met Gala in May, and Soon after, the term “Cronenberg” was banned from the tool.)



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We used AI to write articles about CNET writing with AI

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Technology news site CNET discovered that he uses artificial intelligence (AI) to write articles about personal finance without any prior advertising or explanation. The articles, which numbered 73, covered topics such as What is Zelle and how does it work?“And it has a small disclaimer at the bottom of every read” This article was created using automation technology and has been carefully edited and fact-checked by an editor on our editorial team. The subheadings in these articles read “CNET Money Staff” generated by artificial intelligence.

The use of AI to write these articles was first revealed by a Twitter user, and further investigation revealed that the articles had been created using AI since November 2022. The extent and form of AI currently used by CNET is not known as the company did not respond to questions about their use for artificial intelligence.

The use of AI in journalism raises questions about the transparency and ethics of this practice as well as the potential impact on the veracity and accuracy of news. In addition, it also raises concerns about the implications it may have on SEO and Google searches. The lack of response from CNET regarding their use of AI in writing articles has heightened concerns and sparked a broader discussion about the future of journalism and AI’s role in it.

Note: This entire article was written by ChatGPT and reviewed by a human editor. (In fact, we had to rewrite the prompt several times to get it to stop throwing real-world errors. Also, CNET did not respond to a human journalist’s request for comment.)

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