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Space travel: Going to space is a real back pain

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Astronauts can temporarily gain 2 inches tall but experience muscle loss and back pain

More countermeasures involving exercise may help relieve pain and muscle loss



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A six-month stay on the International Space Station may be a backache for astronauts. While they may temporarily reach a height of 2 inches, this effect is accompanied by weakening of the muscles supporting the spine, according to the New study.

Astronauts have reported back pain since the late 1980s, when spaceflight grew longer. Medical data from their flights shows that more than half of American astronauts report back pain, especially in the lower back. Up to 28% indicated that the pain was moderate to severe, sometimes as long as their task.

Things don’t get any better when you return to Earth’s gravity. In the first year after their mission, astronauts were 4.3 times more likely to have a herniated disc.

Douglas Chang, first author of the new study and associate professor of orthopedics and chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation services at UCSD Health told UCSD. “So this study is the first to take it from just an epidemiological description and look at the potential mechanisms of what happens with the emergence of astronauts.”

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Much attention has been focused on the intervertebral discs, the spongy shock absorbers between our vertebrae, as the cause of the back problems astronauts face. But the new study contradicts this thinking. In this research, which was funded by NASA, Zhang’s team noticed few changes in the discs, their elevation, or their swelling.

What they observed in six astronauts who spent four to seven months on the International Space Station was massive deterioration and atrophy of the supporting muscles in the lumbar (lower) spine, Chang said. These muscles are what help us stay erect, walk and move our upper limbs in an environment like the ground, while protecting our discs and ligaments from strain or injury.

In microgravity, the torso lengthens, likely due to spinal unloading, as the curvature of the spine is flattened. Zhang said astronauts also don’t use muscle tone in their lower backs because they don’t bend or use their lower back for movement, as they would on Earth. This is where the pain and stiffness occurs, as if the astronauts had been in a body for six months.

MRI scans before and after the missions revealed that the astronauts experienced a 19% decrease in these muscles during their flight. “Even after six weeks of training and regeneration here, they only recover 68% of their losses,” Zhang explained.

Zhang and his team consider this a serious problem for long-range manned missions, especially when considering a trip to Mars that could take just eight or nine months to reach the Red Planet. This flight, and the potential time astronauts spend in Mars’ gravity – 38% of the surface gravity on Earth – creates the potential for muscle atrophy and loss of conditioning.

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The team’s future research will also look at reported neck problems, as there could be more cases of muscle atrophy and a slower recovery period. They also hope to partner with another university in the field of spinal ultrasound, to look at what happens to astronauts while on the space station.

Since no one likes back pain and muscle loss, Zhang suggested countermeasures that should be added to the two to three hours of exercise astronauts practice daily on the space station. Although their exercise machines focus on a range of issues including cardiovascular and skeletal health, the team believes that space travelers also need to include a core strengthening program focused on the spine.

In addition to the “fetal bend” pose that astronauts use in microgravity to stretch the lower back or relieve back pain, Zhang suggested yoga. But he knows it’s easier said than done.

“A lot of yoga is based on the effects of gravity, like downward dog, where stretching through the hamstrings, calf muscles, back of the neck and shoulders is possible due to gravity. When you remove that, you may not get the same benefit.”

Any machines on the space station must also be designed for weight, size, and even the bounces they can produce on the station.

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Scott Parazynski, who has walked in space seven times, helped build the space station in 2007.

Zhang and the other researchers brainstormed with the VR team about different exercise programs that would enable astronauts to invite friends, family, or even Twitter followers to join them in a virtual exercise, making the daily repetition of their exercises more fun and competitive.

One of his teammates felt this pain personally. Dr. Scott Paraczynski He is the only astronaut to reach the summit of Mount Everest. He suffered a herniated disc after returning from the International Space Station to Earth. Less than a year later, when he attempted to climb Everest the first time, he had to be airlifted. After the rehabilitation process, he finally reached the top. Now, he’s talking to current astronauts about ways they can contribute to studies about their health in microgravity.

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  • Chang said keeping the astronauts healthy and fit is the least they can do.

    “When a crew returns, they say on one side of the space station, they see this beautiful blue planet,” he said. “Everything they hold dear is on this fragile little planet. And they look out the other window and see only infinity stretching into blackness, and they come back with a different sense of themselves and their place in the universe.

    “They are all committed to enhancing space knowledge and taking incremental steps forward in whatever way possible for the next crew.”

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    Screenshots made by an AI director from a fake movie rage Twitter

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    Scofield soon realizes that he is not alone. A small cadre of movie-obsessed artists and artists have harnessed the power of generative AI tools to reimagine classic films – or create entirely new ones – from some of the world’s most iconic names. In December, creator Johnny Darrell went viral Jodorowsky You see, a reimagining of the classic film under the eyes of groundbreaking director Alejandro Jodorowski. Inspired by Darrell, Washington-based Rob Sheridan, former art director of Nine Inch Nails, used artificial intelligence to create Jodorowsky Fraser.

    Sheridan, 42, calls this AI-powered movement “The New Unreal.” Practitioners include a painter based in New Zealand Create a western space on Instagram and a sculptor from Austin, Texas, Making fake sci-fi TV shows. Another content creator from India is using AI image generators to create his own rich font Sci-fi with a Southeast Asian flavor.

    “We’re starting to see this technology as something like a dream engine, leveraging a kind of distorted visual awareness to explore things that never were, never will be, never could be,” Sheridan said. “They hit you in a weird way, because they feel like They are very reasonable.”

    Scofield said he didn’t know why his Cronenberg business was catching fire so quickly. He’s posted several previous experiments on Imgur, Reddit, and Twitter, all of which only got between 50 and 100 likes. “The intention was not to create a clickbait site, but I think it turned into that,” he said. “A lot of people were reposting it and saying, This is terrible. This man does not understand Cronenberg at all.Each time they did, it spread further and incited another wave of criticism, which incited another, and another, and another.

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    Schoefield said the text of his tweet — simply “David Cronenberg’s Galaxy of Flesh (1985)” — could give the false impression that he was trying to deceive Twitter. “There is no real intent behind this title yet, Oh yeah, looks like that could be it,” he said. “But he seemed to really impress people, and I think someone like Cronenberg might be famous enough to have a fanbase.

    He continued, “There are a lot of people who have opinions about what Cronenberg’s aesthetics are and what they are not, and what a bad interpretation of his style is.” He fears that people will think he is trying to reduce Cronenberg’s work to mere physical horror.

    The frames themselves were created by giving Midjourney a “DVD screen” prompt of various scenes from the film The empire strikes. Then it was like: Everything is made of skin, joints, tendons, nerves, umbilical cords, stomach, and arteriesSchofield added.

    Getting a photo creator to make blood was hard — like getting Cronenberg style. “You can’t even write ‘Cronenberg’ in Midjourney,” Scofield said. (Sheridan thinks it’s because of him: He made a series of Cronenberg-inspired photos for the Met Gala in May, and Soon after, the term “Cronenberg” was banned from the tool.)



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    We used AI to write articles about CNET writing with AI

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    Technology news site CNET discovered that he uses artificial intelligence (AI) to write articles about personal finance without any prior advertising or explanation. The articles, which numbered 73, covered topics such as What is Zelle and how does it work?“And it has a small disclaimer at the bottom of every read” This article was created using automation technology and has been carefully edited and fact-checked by an editor on our editorial team. The subheadings in these articles read “CNET Money Staff” generated by artificial intelligence.

    The use of AI to write these articles was first revealed by a Twitter user, and further investigation revealed that the articles had been created using AI since November 2022. The extent and form of AI currently used by CNET is not known as the company did not respond to questions about their use for artificial intelligence.

    The use of AI in journalism raises questions about the transparency and ethics of this practice as well as the potential impact on the veracity and accuracy of news. In addition, it also raises concerns about the implications it may have on SEO and Google searches. The lack of response from CNET regarding their use of AI in writing articles has heightened concerns and sparked a broader discussion about the future of journalism and AI’s role in it.

    Note: This entire article was written by ChatGPT and reviewed by a human editor. (In fact, we had to rewrite the prompt several times to get it to stop throwing real-world errors. Also, CNET did not respond to a human journalist’s request for comment.)

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    Elon Musk has officially lost more private money than anyone else in history

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    Bill Buckner. Justin Guarini. Everyone who “ran” against Vladimir Putin. Now Elon Musk has joined the ranks of the biggest losers in history. the Awarded by the Guinness Book of World Records CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and Twitter, a record-breaking loss of personal wealth. Forbes has estimated that in the past year or so, Musk’s wealth has declined by $182 billion.

    In November 2021, Musk’s wealth peaked at nearly $320 billion, making him the richest man in the world. Most of that, however, was Tesla stock, which has plummeted in value through 2022. His October 2022 purchase of Twitter for $44 billion — which he financed with some of his Tesla stock — also caused a huge buzz in his bottom line.

    In December, Musk’s losses stripped off His top of Forbes existingAnd the title of the richest person in the world went to Bernard Arnault from the LVMH Group, which owns such luxury brands as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Sephora. Forbes noted That many other billionaires will take big losses in 2022, when technology stocks will be hit hard. Jeff Bezos lost $85 billion, and Mark Zuckerberg saw $77 billion of his wealth disappear.

    The previous world record for largest loss of personal wealth was held by Masayoshi Son, CEO of Softbank, who lost more than $59 billion during the dot-com crash of 2000. Today, Son is ranked 67th on Forbes’ list of billionaires.

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