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Public Service Broadcasting Seeks Unity Say ABC, CBC & RNZ Bosses – Deadline

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Every year, around 20 of the world’s most influential public broadcasters get together to discuss the issues of the day such as the challenge from global streaming platforms, rights and the very purpose of their existence. The Public Broadcasters International conference is part-debate, part-agenda setting and part-pep talk in truth.

Last week, The Public Media Alliance and its Global Task Force sub-group — which comprises the BBC, France Télévisions, KBS, CBC/Radio Canada, the ABC, ZDF, RNZ and SVT — headed to Tokyo for the latest confab. Once there, CBC/Radio-Canada CEO and President and Global Task Force Chair Catherine Tait delivered an impassioned rallying cry to her PSB colleagues.

Her focus was on building a “united global voice” for public service media, with the speech ending: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go with others. Alone — faced with the reach and heft of the global players — we risk losing our audiences. Together, we are stronger.”

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CBC/Radio Canada’s Catherine Tait speaks at the PBI conference, alongside RNZ’s Paul Thompson (L) and ABC’s David Anderson (R)

Harry Lock / PBI

Before the speech, Deadline sat down virtually with Tait, Managing Director of Australia’s ABC David Anderson and Paul Thompson, CEO of New Zealand’s RNZ, to get their views on the global and domestic future.

Locally, CBC/Radio Canada is going through a rough license renewal process that has upset some of the local production community, who are concerned prescribed baseline production levels could fall. Tait told us that she was “hopeful” the new, lighter-touch regulation system could be established with more focus on spend on digital commissions (previously not counted towards quotas) and investment in representing Canadian diversity.

The ABC has been considering pushing more program budget to digital content and local reports claim it will move towards a genre-based commissioning structure – similar to those adopted by CBC and the BBC in the UK. Anderson, who has not spoken publicly about the report before, didn’t comment directly but said: “I do think any organization should be evolving. It’s about how you organize yourselves to make the best decisions possible.”

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New Zealand state broadcaster RNZ, meanwhile, will merge with TVNZ next year to create the Aotearoa New Zealand Public Media, and Thompson provided some color on what that means for the country. “The world continues to be an incredibly turbulent place, so this is about ensuring New Zealanders have access to at least one resilient, comprehensive, trusted public media entity,” he said.

“It’s about bigger aspirations around reflecting our identity and diversity of content and connecting and informing, but this is also an insurance policy in terms of trusted media in troubling times.”

Read on for more about the state of public service media.

DEADLINE: Where is public broadcasting at right now?

Catherine Tait: We’ve had some very challenging years with the pandemic but important years for public service broadcasting. The news cycle has been so profoundly hyper-speed that our audience numbers and ratings have lifted, and we’ve had engagement with our domestic audiences that we’ve really not seen in a long time. On the one hand, we come out of this kind of pandemic wave with a buoyant audience relationship, but at the same time, we have big challenges that lie ahead, whether that’s from global streamers, or from issues like online violence to journalists.

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David Anderson: It’s a testament that people turned to public broadcasting for information they can trust. They want valuable content and analysis they can interpret themselves to understand what’s happening, and we’re the natural counter to misinformation and fear mongering. The challenge for us is to position ourselves such that future generations know that that’s what we’re there for. You need to remain trusted, relevant and valued into the future.

Paul Thompson: Strong public systems strongly correlate to freedom of expression, rule of law and high trust, so despite everything the world is going through, public media still has a very important role. While we often assume the rest of the world shares our values on democracy and freedom of expression, most of the world actually has a form of authoritarian government, and freedom of expression is under threat. We have to remind ourselves of the importance of the mission but also take a dose of humility here: the days of public service broadcasting dominating the market for talent, programing and audiences are long gone. Most of us are really having to innovate and adapt to the power of global platforms.

DEADLINE: It’s been a period of reflection for public broadcasting — how it fits into a wider ecosystem of global streamers and what it is truly for. Where do you see PSB in 10 years?

DA: We have to be strategic to fit in. There is a plethora of choice in the entertainment space and a limited amount of funding, so you have to position yourself and stress that ‘local’ works. Part of the mandate of any PSB is to reflect the culture and the people you serve — ‘nothing about us without us.’ But there are pressures on costs – in Australia they’ve gone up 20% per hour annually for the past two or three years, so you have to start thinking about quality or quantity.

CT: When I first started at CBC I said “local is the new national” and I’ve changed that soundbite to “local is the new global.” Proximity is the absolute single most important competitive advantage that we have – we have an increasingly diverse population thanks to an influx of immigration over the past 15 years. That’s something that a global streamer, just by virtue of their structure, cannot do.

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We’ve had to ask some pretty hard questions about where we’re going to spend those precious dollars that we have. Is it uniquely Canadian, and does it reflect the diverse nature of our people? I’ve spoken before about Sort Of and you have to think to yourself who else would tell the story of a transgender Pakistani nanny? Those choices become very important.

DEADLINE: Where else can public broadcast services make a difference?

PT: The streaming world is quite congested and I think there is going to be massive consolidation around the services. We need to play a long game – as well as expressions of public identity we have proven we’re durable institutions. We’ll be there when the current streaming world has peaked and is ebbing, and I expect opportunities to open up. We need to provide those stepping stones for our journalists, indie producers and our communities in the future.

DEADLINE: What role did the pandemic play on the plans to merge RNZ with TVNZ? 

PT: The policy predates the pandemic, but it probably did cause our government to think a little bit more about the sustainable future for public media in New Zealand. Frankly, there were probably other ways of tackling the policy challenge, but I can see the logic of creating one entity and making sure the increased public funding they’re going to put in will create a really strong, sustainable entity.

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DEADLINE: Canada, Australia and New Zealand all have production sectors that create an outsized number of international hits, in comparison to their populations. How do you get that right?

PT: One of the big challenges that any public media entity has is to represent the production community or labor groups. You’re not going to do that by buying up tonnes of independent producers so that they are all in house. Instead, you have to foster independent producers as a way to build up talent.

CT: We have a highly regulated history in Canada and are required to commission at least 80% of what we do from independent producers. We really spend a lot of time on the emerging talent piece of the puzzle. We hope the bigger players won’t just cherrypick after we’ve done all the development work, but unfortunately that does happen.

If we don’t get it right with the independent production sector, we really miss a great opportunity to achieve that relevance – the value proposition for the creative industry in Canada. Bur we’re the largest commissioner of original programs of national importance and contribute about C$1.5BN ($1.1B) to the creative economy, so when opposing forces say, “Defund the CBC,” we say, “Well, if you do that, you gut the independent production sector.”

DEADLINE: The latest CBC license renewal has been fraught, with indie body the CMPA claiming it will remove the demand for CBC to work with producers at prescribed levels. The regulator, the CRTC, is now re-evaluating its content. Where are you with that?

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CT: Our big ask was about the digital hours we commission – we’re mainly talking entertainment content – because the audience is moving to our streaming platforms but those digital commissions are not counted towards our quotas. Going forwards, they will, which is huge. We also felt strongly felt we should be incentivized to better reflect the changing population in Canada and regulation was put in place for us to do that through expenditure requirements.

But if people reject a regulatory decision in Canada, they have the right to petition the cabinet and there were significant objections from independent producers, the guilds and other stakeholders. They questioned whether the lighter regulatory regime would cause us to stray from our license, so it went back to the CRTC, but what they didn’t do is ask CRTC to reconsider the whole framework. The commission will look to see if they want to put more suspenders and buckles on us, but I’m hopeful we’ll get a good response. We know we can’t just expect trust.

DEADLINE: What’s the situation like in Australia?

DA: The indie sector relies on the ABC because we exceed all the others put together. We have statutory independence and no quotas, which is a bone of contention, but we do voluntary reports on where we spend and what other money we leverage from other places such as co-productions. Our argument is that we can’t be the only part of a sustainable production economy. There needs to be some regulatory reform that helps.

DEADLINE: Local reports in Australia suggest ABC is going to move to a genre-based commissioning structure similar to CBC or the BBC. What can you say about that reform.

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DA: I haven’t spoken about that publicly yet, and it was a leak, but I do think any organization should be evolving. It’s about how you organize yourselves to make the best decisions possible. Public service broadcasting is too important, whatever the genre. It needs to be set up to make sense.

DEADLINE: How can you work together to better compete with the streamers?

PT: TVNZ has successful partnerships in place with the BBC and is currently shooting The Flood with RTÉ [as Deadline revealed in September]. The merger with RNZ could benefit that further and we’re going to want to collaborate. 

CT: These co-productions are not a slam dunk but there are pockets of programing such as kids and factual where you can find success. Drama is always going to be tougher. The streamers, to give credit, have helped re-train audiences to listen to different accents or read subtitles. Previously, there was been resistance to foreign language programs in our country. 

DEADLINE: Financially, global streamers are attracting the biggest talent. How do you ensure you can work with big-name talent that really sells your programs? 

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CT: One of our great filmmakers is Richie Mehta and when I saw Dehli Crime on Netflix a little part of my heart broke that it wasn’t on CBC. Having worked in the creative business my entire career, it’s a wonderful thing that writers and directors are breaking through in a way they never had before. It’s a renaissance of the auteur-driven storytelling that we hadn’t seen for 10 or 15 years. We can celebrate that, but you are right: it is tough on us. We don’t want to be door number four. We want to be door number one. We believe our competitive advantage is risk taking, creative freedom and ownership of rights.

DA: I’m so thrilled for people who start at the ABC and then go on to other things — it’s a source of pride we could provide the platforms and resources for them to build their careers. It’s through the indie production sector that we see this happen and if you handle it right, they always come back and work with you again, maybe as mentors. That’s been seen as our role editorially over the years, allowing people to take risks to shine. The talent dips back in and out but we can’t afford to warehouse talent. We’re quite happy to have that role.



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Kevin McKidd’s estranged wife Ariel files for divorce

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Kevin McKidd and Ariel Goldratt. Cathy Hutchins/Shutterstock

Make it official. Ariel Goldratt He filed for divorce from Kevin McKiddfive months after instinct anatomy The star initially announced their split.

Goldrath, 34, filed to officially end their marriage on Monday, December 5, according to documents obtained by her. us weeklyciting “irreconcilable differences”.

McKidd, 49, married the chef in 2018. They share a son, Aiden, 4, and a daughter, Nava, 3. brave The voice actor also shares son Joseph, 20, and daughter Iona, 22, with ex-wife Jane Parker, whom he was married to from 1999 to 2017.

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A native of Scotland, who has She played Dr. Owen Hunt grey Since 2008, he initially announced their separation in July, citing his split from Goldrath months earlier.

“I don’t often share my personal life on social media, but today there is something I want to share with you,” McKidd shared via Instagram at the time. “A few months ago, Ariel and I decided to end the marriage part of our relationship. We came to this conclusion after much research and discussion. We know this is right for both of us.”

He added, “Ariel is an amazing mother to Aiden and Nava. She is one of the wisest, smartest and most loving people I have ever known. We still have the highest love and respect for each other.”

McKidd reassured his followers that he and Goldrath remained on good terms.

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“We were able to redefine our lives and our love for each other in a beautiful way,” he explained. It was not easy and required a lot of effort and self-examination. It was all worth it to get to where we are now: a deep, honest relationship as parents and true friends with an amazing shared history and beautiful children and family.”

He concluded, “I wish us well and reimbursement in the future, as we wish all of you. It’s good to share this part of my life and let you all know that even with challenges, it’s possible to reach happy conclusions if we show up for each other and stay open. Ariel and I will always be there for you.” Each other. I hope everyone is blessed with this: raising their children with one of your best friends.”

grey costar Caterina Scorsonewho plays Amelia Shepherd in medical dramaShe shared her support at the time. “I love you to the moon. I love the beautiful babies you guys have made. We love your respect, love, and care for one another.” Special training The alum, 41, captioned the announcement on Instagram. “Very graceful. Very authentic. Very brave. ❤️❤️❤️ Living life beautifully..”

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Zoey Deutch rocked Tiffany blue to celebrate the upcoming release of her new movie

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Zoe Deutch rocked a baby blue bodysuit to celebrate the upcoming release of her new movie, Something From Tiffany’s

Zoey Deutch posted stunning photos on Tuesday in celebration of the upcoming release of her new movie, Something From Tiffany’s.

The 28-year-old actress looked like something off her feet in her Instagram post wearing a “Tiffany blue” themed outfit with matching eye shadow and manicure.

Styled in a light blue blazer and matching skirt, the beauty showed some skin while still being chic.

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Something Blue: Zoey Deutch showed off her stunning look in photos for her new movie, Something From Tiffany’s

Lady Regal: The beauty got up close and personal to show off her supple skin and minimal makeup look

Her blonde hair was parted to the side and left in loose waves.

One notable aspect of her outfit was the lack of jewelry, apart from a pair of dangling pearl earrings. The simplicity of the jewelry left more room for the outfit and makeup to impress.

Produced by Hello Sunshine, Reese Witherspoon’s production company, the story follows Rachel, played by Deutch, whose life is upended when an engagement ring meant for someone else leads her to the person she’s meant to be with.

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Classic with a twist: The 28-year-old exudes a model’s demeanor while donning an elegant and tasteful outfit.

Beauty Queen: The actress looked slightly to the side to give a royal aura

The movie will be released on Amazon Prime to stream on December 9th.

The star is the daughter of actress Lea Thompson, who is best known for her roles in Back to the Future and Switched at Birth. Deutch has also accomplished a very notable filmography.

Best known for her starring roles in Set it Up, Vampire Academy, and most recently her role in Hulu’s Not Okay, the beauty has earned credits in many genres.

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Earrings: Pearl earrings dangling from the actress’s ears as her signature piece, the only jewelry she wore

Recently, the actress reported a home break-in in Los Angeles, California where $300,000 in cash and jewelry was stolen.

Fortunately, no one was home when the break-in occurred.

Since then, she’s put on a brave face and has gone on to promote her movie and even attended a Tiffany & Co party soon after.

One last look: Posted on Deutch’s Instagram story, take a look at the accessories from the shoot

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Release date, cast, episodes, plot, spoilers and more

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“This season to be a Mason!” Cheers Matthew Rhyswho seems noticeably happier — really elated — than he did My last phone call with him. That was August 2020, AKA season finale Perry Mason, AKA the second wave of the pandemic. I’m sure we talked about burgers through brain fog, both of us, raving while we celebrated our six-month anniversary indoors. So, oddly enough, Reese’s hearing and damned good mood sound like a milestone. Is that correct? Are we allowed to peek behind the wall, dare we stir something up again?

Well Reese, along with Perry Mason Showrunner Michael Pegler sure seems to think so. And what pleases us today, the cause of the good news and the cheers of a Monday afternoon phone call? We are here to talk Perry Mason the second season. he is coming. in March. to me HBO. When we last saw him on the drama series, where Reese plays a private investigator turned attorney in Depression-era Los Angeles, Mason finally had something to hang his stylish fedora on. The guy wrapped a brutal case. He had a big moment on court. At the end of it all, he had what Reese calls a “Charlie’s Angels” moment, teaming up with Paul Drake and Della Street. Season two should be a breeze, right?

no. There is another murder. Here’s the official tagline, from HBO: “Months after the conclusion of the Dodson case, the scion of a powerful oil family is brutally murdered. When a DA goes to the town’s Hoovervilles to identify the most obvious suspects, Perry, Della, and Paul find themselves at the center of a case that will expose far-reaching conspiracies.” And it forces them to reckon with what it really means to be guilty.” This time, the cast includes Reese, Juliette Rylance, Chris Chalk, Diara Kilpatrick, Eric Lange, Justin Kirk, Katherine Waterston, Hope Davis, Fabrizio Guido, Peter Mendoza, Mark O’Brien, Paul Rasey, Gene Tulloch, John Chaffin, Onawa Rodriguez, Ji Young Han, Sean Astin, Tommy Dewey, Shea Whigham, and Wallace Langham.

It’s the season to really be a Mason. Let’s go to her. Rhys and Begler are here with your first appearance of Perry Mason Season 2, which includes, but is not limited to: a vintage Harley Davidson motorcycle, a murder case, and a new team that’s already “drifting too much.”

First look images courtesy of HBO and Merrick Morton.

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“I think you find him treading water – but I think it goes beyond that,” Matthew Rhys says of what we’ll see when we meet Perry Mason again. “He’s just a little bit trying to keep his head up and figure out what he wants with his life.”

HBO / Merrick Morton

Esquire: I heard this season takes place in 1933 — the same year Esquire was founded. Does this mean the entire plot is just Perry Mason’s attempt to freelance for Esquire?

Matthew Rice: yes! He calls out, “Hemingway can’t write for money! Give me a job!”

Michael Bigler: “I have a lot of short stories!” Then he reads it.

the master: yes. Each episode is a short story that Mason creates and pitches to Esquire.

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The last time I spoke to you, Matthew, was in August of 2020, the end of the season — we were going into the second wave of the pandemic. Can the two of you catch up with me where your heads were when I started building the new season?

Megabyte: Well, we joined the trip in March 2021, and we started talking with Matthew right away about it. I think that [co-showrunner Jack Amiel] And I started diving into the research at the time and what was going on — looking particularly at the founding of Esquire as a starting point. But really, just not looking at Well, where is Perry at this point, but Where was Los Angeles at this point?

What immediately struck us was that this was the worst year of depression in L.A. We really took that and ran with it, because of this whole idea of ​​L.A. — the glamorous financial side of the city, but also an enormous amount of poverty. There are all those Hoovervilles that are popping up. You saw this world in the first season, but we wanted to explore it more.

“There are all these Hoovervilles that pop up,” says Michael Bigler, the series’ showrunner about 1933 Los Angeles. “You saw this world in the first season, but we wanted to explore it more.”

HBO / Merrick Morton

When we last see Perry, he’s said goodbye to Alice, and he’s had his big moment in court, wrapping up this incredibly painful case. What does Perry want when we see him again?

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the master: I think when we see him in the next season — you kind of touched on something there — what you see is Perry who doesn’t quite know what he wants. I think he found himself in a situation where he got into the judicial system, the legal system, with a lot, maybe…

Megabyte: Would you say fear?

the master: the fear. I don’t think there was much of a game plan. He just saw someone hurt the rail and went, “That’s wrong.” And then he finds himself in this situation, where I think the reality of the legal and judicial system has somewhat collapsed around him. He says, “This is a very flawed way of trying to decipher right and wrong.” I think the Emily Dodson case has taken its toll.

I think you find him treading water – but I think it goes beyond that. He’s just trying a little bit to keep his head up and figure out what he wants with his life. It’s a little lost, which is true I think, of the first season. He is always an outsider. It’s always a perfect fit in any setting, and I think that’s true in season two again. You find him trying to figure out if this is really something he not only wants to do, but could actually do.

you are right. At the end of the season, Perry gets a little more organized in his life, and comes with this core team of Della and Paul in the office. But he also seems to be asking more questions of himself as the credits roll.

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the master: Yes Yes. very much like that. It’s these big life changes that give him those big questions and make him look inward sometimes.

Megabyte: He countered this theory by Hamilton Burger, that there is no real justice. There is only an illusion of justice. I think that weighs heavily on Perry throughout the entire season. Like, what is all this about? Through this case, explore that, and try to find an answer to that.

“Where you actually find them again in Season 2 is that they drift a lot apart,” Reese says of Della, Paul, and Perry’s new team.

HBO / Merrick Morton

Can you tell me anything about the new case?

Megabyte: What I will say is that it really deals with, as I said earlier: What does justice look like for people who have the means and the power, versus those who have nothing? It’s a murder case, but the circumstances… I just don’t want to give away too much.

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No, that’s perfect. What would Perry, Della and Paul’s team look like?

the master: I think what’s great about the drama is that you imagine it – especially at the end of season one, just forming a Charlie’s Angels moment – where you actually find them again in season two is that they drift so much apart from each other. The work that Perry, I think, did not promise, but certainly hoped Paul could do, has not been fruitful. It builds Paul’s resentment, because he gave up so much in order to join Perry’s team. Perry is very disappointed in what he is doing. I think this frustrates Della very much. She’s trying to remain the driving force in this, trying to keep them all not only afloat – but also to keep her own ambitions in check, as Perry seems to veer a little too far on mandate.

Looking at these photos, I have to ask you, Matthew: Are you riding a vintage Harley-Davidson motorcycle?

the master: It’s me! I’m the one doing the stunts. My passionate business. But it was very easy to ride a motorcycle. There was an intro on the original Harley Davidson, to which the stunt coordinator said, “Okay, so you have to hit that lever, and then engage the clutch right there at this moment.” Everyone soon realized that there was no way on God’s Green Earth that could ever happen, so they modified it and turned it into an expensive electric motorcycle.

Yep, that’s Reese, looking seriously as heck, like he dropped out of Top Gun: The Prequel. “Me! I’m the one doing the stunts. My passion,” he says.

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HBO / Merrick Morton

I want to interview that person when the season comes.

the master: Worth an interview, because they also said, “Can you get this done in a month?” He said, “Not really, no! But I’ll try.” he did. he did. He is one of those mechanical geniuses. He said, “Well, I took this electric bike away and then rebuilt it inside an old Harley-Davidson.”

Jeez.

the master: What I’ve enjoyed most about going to the site is, oftentimes, the old boys usually come up and go, “Is this a 1930’s, Harley ’31?” And I say, “Yeah, it is.” They’re like, “How is it not making any noise?” I’m like, “Because it has a giant battery inside its tank.” You will be met with a divided reaction. 50% disgusted and 50% dumbfounded at how it would change.

Did I miss something about the new season?

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the master: I will think about it. Michael, are you just thinking – using just one line – what the first look or teaser will be like for this season?

Megabyte: Jesus.

the master: you write!

Megabyte: I know I know. My God. I was thinking about that whole trip this morning. I would say the first season dealt a lot with the church and the corrupt police – and really, again, we wanted to build it up. So I think we’re playing with a bigger board [now]. But at the same time … we use a softer brush.

the master: Fabulous.

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ESQUIRE Well then!

MR: I steal it.

HBO / Merrick Morton

HBO / Merrick Morton

HBO / Merrick Morton
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HBO / Merrick Morton

HBO / Merrick Morton

HBO / Merrick Morton

HBO / Merrick Morton

HBO / Merrick Morton
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HBO / Merrick Morton

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