Connect with us

Business

In an empty kitchen, a Yemeni family fights hunger By Reuters

Published

on

6/6

© Reuters. Amal Hassan’s children wait for lunch at their hut in Sanaa on August 29, 2022. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah

2/6

From Khaled Abdullah and Abdul Rahman Al-Anisi

SANAA (Reuters) – In an empty kitchen in her home in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, Umm Zakaria al-Sharabi prepares for the daily challenge of preparing a meal from almost nothing to feed 18 people in her extended family.

“Today we haven’t had lunch yet,” she says, pointing at an empty stove. In the corner, a bread bag and some pots of spices are the only leftovers on hand. “Every day is like this…we have nothing in the kitchen, we have nothing.”

Advertisement

Eight years of conflict, which began when Houthi rebels took control of Sanaa and then expanded after the Saudi-led coalition launched air strikes against them, has devastated the economy and left millions across Yemen struggling to feed themselves.

A truce agreed in April provided some relief, but the United Nations says the number of families without adequate food has continued to increase since then. The truce expired on Monday without agreement on another extension.

Umm Hani, the mother-in-law of Umm Zakaria, who shares her home in central Sanaa, says that before the war they lived modestly but were living modestly on her husband’s salary from his job in the Ministry of Education and the money she earned as a maid.

“Our situation was fine. I worked for a family on a regular basis and my son…worked and his brother too.”

“For now, I swear we can’t buy flour,” Umm Hani says. “Look in the kitchen and everywhere. Even flour, simply flour, we don’t have. And we don’t have rice…”

Advertisement

“We have some bread that I just brought from the bakery. We will eat it with tomato sauce or whatever is available.”

The Sharabi family’s struggles are shared across Yemen, both in key populated areas like Sanaa controlled by the Iran-allied Houthis, and the rest of the country controlled by forces backed by the Saudi-led coalition. Both sides were under international pressure to reach a peace agreement.

The United Nations says 19 million people – or 60% of the population – suffer from what it calls acute food insecurity, where shortages put people’s lives or livelihoods at grave risk.

Aid from donor countries meets only half of the country’s needs, according to the World Food Program (WFP), which runs the largest operation in Yemen it has ever carried out, providing flour, pulses, oil, sugar and food vouchers.

Families like the Sharabis fought back. Those who can sell assets or family legacies, and even plots of land. Others have been supported by neighbors or relatives abroad.

Advertisement

“The capacity of the Yemeni people to adapt in this time of conflict is enormous,” said Richard Ragan, WFP Representative in Yemen. “(They) do everything someone does in a time of crisis. But it’s not easy. I think a lot of people in the country are on the verge of collapse.”

Although the truce eased the violence, Rajan said the WFP was still stockpiling and tackling the impact of the fuel shortage. “When you’re feeding close to 20 million people on a regular basis, it’s very hard to turn that on and off,” he said.

In the second half of the year, the number of people deemed food insecure as an emergency rose by a quarter to 7.14 million while the number of people “in disaster” rose fivefold to 161,000, according to UN estimates.

“The biggest challenge… is that the inadequacy of aid compared to the number of people in need continues to increase,” said Nabil al-Qudsi of the Houthi-run School Feeding and Humanitarian Relief Project, which is delivering food to 3 people. million people in 12 out of 21 governorates in Yemen.

In the Graf neighborhood north of Sanaa, Amal Hassan, her husband and three children live in one small room where they have moved after their previous rent has become too high.

Advertisement

Hassan travels to work as a maid in another part of the capital, spending most of her income on transportation and saving between 1,000 and 2,000 riyals ($1.7 to $3.4) each time.

She is looking for an affordable rental home, but says her day is dominated by worrying about feeding her family.

“When they finish breakfast, I start thinking about where to have lunch. After that, I worry about dinner. I never had a chance to think about how to build their future or educate them because we could barely think about their food.”

Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Business

MicroStrategy is at its lowest level since 2020 after the sales were revealed

Published

on

By

(Bloomberg) — Shares of MicroStrategy touched their lowest level since August 2020 after the enterprise software company, which in recent years has been known as the largest buyer of bitcoin, revealed its first sale of the token.

Most Read from Bloomberg

The stock fell 1.1 percent to $136.63 on Thursday, down 75 percent this year. Bitcoin rose less than 1% to around $16,590 and is believed to have fallen 64% since the start of the year.

Advertisement

In a filing on Wednesday, MicroStrategy said it acquired approximately 2,395 Bitcoin between the beginning of November and December 21 through its subsidiary MacroStrategy, and paid out approximately $42.8 million in cash. It then sold 704 of the tokens on Dec. 22 for a total of about $11.8 million, citing tax purposes, before buying another 810 of them two days later.

Matt Malley, chief market strategist for Miller Tabak + Co. Step down as CEO. This news means they don’t seem to want to do that anytime soon.”

Overall, MicroStrategy held about 132,500 bitcoins worth over $4 billion USD as of December 27th. The company paid an average purchase price of $30,397 per bitcoin.

“Given MicroStrategy’s $2.4 billion in leverage, we believe the company may have a lot of leverage over Bitcoin, and may face some liquidity risk,” Jefferies analyst Brent Thiel wrote in a note on Wednesday. Thill has an “underperform” rating on the stock and a price target of $110.

Over the years of the pandemic, MicroStrategy has become well known for its Bitcoin takeovers, largely led by Saylor. Earlier this year, Saylor stepped down from that role and now serves as CEO at the company and continues to lead its bitcoin strategy.

Advertisement

MicroStrategy was trading around $120 before Saylor first announced the company’s Bitcoin purchases in 2020. The stock reached an all-time high of $1,315 in February 2021.

(Updates to include the stock’s closing price in the second paragraph.)

Most Read by Bloomberg Businessweek

© Bloomberg LP 2022

Advertisement

Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Bankman-Fried May File Petition in New York Federal Court Next Week Before Judge Louis Kaplan By Cointelegraph

Published

on

By



Former FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried is set to appear in court on the afternoon of January 3 to enter a lawsuit over two counts of wire fraud and six counts of conspiracy against him related to the collapse of cryptocurrency exchange FTX, according to Reuters. mentioned on December 28, citing court records. Bankman-Fried will appear before District Judge Lewis Kaplan in Manhattan.

Judge Kaplan was appointed to hear the case on December 27 after the original judge in the case, Ronnie Abrams, Resigned herself because of connections between FTX and the law firm Davis Polk & Wardwell, where her husband is a partner. The company provided advisory services to FTX in 2021.