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How weird could things get if Twitter and Elon Musk stabilized?

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Like Elon Musk’s tangled pose with Twitter Moves from the boardroom to the courtroomOne might expect that, under the watchful eye of the Delaware Court, things would take a much more predictable course than they had hitherto.

In theory, the lawsuit that the social media platform launched on Tuesday to force Musk to pursue its takeover offer offers a limited set of potential outcomes: Musk could be forced to close at the agreed-upon $44 billion price; Pay $1 billion termination fee to exit the deal; cough some middle price that the court decides; Or escape completely unscathed.

However, if there is one lesson to be learned from all that has happened thus far, it is that there are no guarantees, even in the face of binding contracts, federal regulations and historical precedent, when it comes to the world’s richest man. Compromise is still an option — some experts even say it’s a possibility — and it will open up a whole new list of options. Here are some of them

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Non-participation agreements

Musk has never been late to criticize Twitter, despite being among the platform’s biggest users.

he has Criticize Its content moderation policies as undemocratic, has lobbied for major changes to both the company’s product and business model, and has consistently criticized the site’s handling of automated spam bots (“the single most annoying problem with Twitter,” he once said Wrote).

His signature on a deal to buy the platform didn’t dampen the barbs. In one of the tweets that Twitter included in the lawsuit, he responded to CEO Parag Agrawal’s remark with nothing but emoji “tube”.

The company complained in the filing: “Since signing the merger agreement, Musk has repeatedly underestimated Twitter and the deal, which has created business risk for Twitter and downward pressure on its share price.” This is despite a stipulation in the deal that Musk’s tweets “do not disparage the company or any of its representatives.”

Charles Elson, founding director of the Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance, said it wouldn’t be unusual for this type of agreement to become part of a long-term settlement. “You can have a non-association agreement” under those kinds of circumstances, he said. “I wouldn’t be shocked.”

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“He won’t detract from Twitter, and they won’t detract from it,” Elson added. ‘It would be a mutual non-compromise.’

Whether Musk will actually abide by these terms is of course a different question entirely.

undisclosed agreements

Also on the table could be some kind of non-disclosure agreement, or NDA, that would limit what one or both parties could share publicly about the relationship they’ve been engaged in since early April.

“I can definitely see a nondisclosure agreement happening which would keep certain terms confidential and allow the side to ‘save face,’” Alex Bruno, founder of Glendale-based law firm Bruno, said in an email.

Bruno added that Twitter may still have to disclose some information, given that it’s been circulating publicly.

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This prospect could be particularly attractive to Twitter because, according to the lawsuit, the company gave Musk extensive access to company information during its dealings, including about 49 tibytes of raw historical site data.

Then again, Musk appears to be currently bound by some kind of NDA, and doesn’t seem to be concerned about it. “Twitter legal has been summoned to complain that I violated their non-disclosure agreement by revealing that the bot scan sample size is 100!” he is Wrote In one tweet in May, he noted his efforts to replicate estimates of the prevalence of bots on Twitter.

Incomplete agreement?

One of the looming threats to Twitter is that if Musk doesn’t end this saga as a platform owner, he may bring back an idea he played with in the past: competing with the company on his own terms.

In one tweet in March, he said Requested What to do about Twitter’s content modification policies, which it has framed as undemocratic. And in a follow-up, he put forward a potential course of action: “Is a new platform needed?”

Later that day added“I’m seriously considering this.”

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Now, with the benefit of seeing some of Twitter’s inner workings firsthand — and enjoying months of free press about how he managed a social network he was in charge — Musk could fall back on that option if he isn’t prevented from doing so.

anyway Twitter alternatives You have historically resist To get into the mainstream, this is a threat that Twitter doesn’t take lightly. The company noted in its lawsuit that Musk said he would “do one of three things with Twitter: sit on its board, buy it, or build a competitor” — the first of which he chose to opt out, and the second of which he appears to be trying very hard to avoid.

Wedbush analyst Dan Ives, a frequent commentator on Musk-Twitter, said: “The biggest wildcard scenario is that Musk needs to pay a huge settlement number to Twitter in the $5 billion to $10 billion range and is also banned from starting his own platform. for social media.” Epic, in an email to The Times. “The Twilight Zone will be ending with this circus show.”

Twitter policy changes

The flattening mask could be used as an opportunity to push for certain policy changes — from highly politicized changes like those around how Twitter modifies users’ speech, to the kind of horses that super users like it care about, including the addition of an “edit Tweet” button.

Even if these concessions came along with a monetary settlement he had to pay, they might provide the public figure with a chance to save face.

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But it’s an unlikely outcome, Bruno said.

“I don’t see any change in the site’s policies unless a lot of money is made available on Twitter,” the lawyer wrote. However, he added, Twitter may still choose to make changes to “publicly show its users that they are active in eliminating bots,” a focus of much of Musk’s criticism.

Elson agreed. “I don’t think he will be able to obtain a change in business practices from them. … This is a business deal at the end of the day. It is [about]“What is the value of this thing?” That’s it.”

But Ives is more open to the possibility.

“If Musk is eventually forced into ownership of Twitter by a court, there may be some areas of content agreed upon as part of a deal,” he said.

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Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts have been reinstated after a two-year ban

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Former President Trump will be allowed to return to Facebook and Instagram after a two-year ban for inciting violence during the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, Facebook’s primary Meta platforms. announce Tuesday.

“The suspension was an extraordinary decision made in exceptional circumstances,” Nick Clegg, Meta’s president of global affairs, said in a blog post. “The normal situation is that the public should be able to hear from a former President of the United States, and a declared candidate for that office again, on our platforms.”

The threat to public safety in January 2021 has “receded enough,” Clegg said, and Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts will be reinstated in the coming weeks with “new firewalls to deter repeat offences.”

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The decision would allow Trump access to 23.3 million followers on Instagram and 34 million followers on Facebook as he seeks to return to the White House. he announce his 2024 presidential campaign in November, and his campaign formally petitioned Meta to reinstate his accounts in a letter to the company on Jan. 17, according to NBC News.

Trump was initially suspended from his Facebook and Instagram accounts on January 6, 2021, after the Meta determined that Trump had made multiple posts encouraging a mob insurrection at the U.S. Capitol while the 2020 electoral votes were being counted. After a review, the company’s oversight board imposed Six months to lift the suspension or make it permanent. Facebook answered By setting a two-year limit on Trump’s suspension, at which point he would “assess whether the risk to public safety has receded.”

This time, Trump will face increased penalties for violating Facebook or Instagram’s Community Standards based on the company’s protocols on restricting the accounts of public figures during civil unrest. Additional content that violates the Meta standards will result in a suspension from one month to two years, Clegg said, depending on the severity of the violation.

Since his removal from Meta platforms, Trump has been posting extensively on Truth Social, a social networking site he launched in February 2022.

“Facebook, which has lost billions of dollars in value since your favorite boss ‘knocked me off’, just announced it will reinstate my account,” he wrote on Wednesday. “Something like this should never happen again to a sitting president, or anyone else who doesn’t deserve revenge!”

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Trump was too Recently restored to Twitter after it was banned in the wake of the January 6 attack, a decision Elon Musk made via a Twitter poll. He hasn’t posted anything on the platform since his account was reactivated.

Trump’s representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Facebook, a powerful networking and fundraising platform, played a major role in Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. In 2020, a senior executive wrote in an internal memo that Facebook’s advertising tools were responsible for Trump’s victory and expected it to lead to his re-election in 2020.

Facebook employees embedded with Trump’s 2016 campaign helped the team with its digital operations, providing free advice on advertising strategy and targeting, According to a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The company said the same services were offered to Hillary Clinton’s campaign as well as other non-political clients of major advertisers on its platform.

Separately, political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica claimed to leverage the private data of millions of Facebook users to guide Trump’s 2016 campaign strategy. The Trump campaign has denied using illegally acquired Facebook data.

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Hank and John Green launched the YouTube College Credit Program

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Hank Green and his brother John, author of Bad luck and other young adult novels, they have posted many hours of educational content on their sites vlogbrothers YouTube channel, which has more than 3.5 million subscribers. Now they’re expanding their mission: Yesterday, the Green Brothers announced a new initiative, Classroomswhich allows users to earn college credit, at a very reasonable price, by taking classes on YouTube.

Study Hall is a partnership between Crash Course, a YouTube-based educational channel produced by Complexly, a company created by the Greens; Arizona State University; and YouTube. The video program guides users through key questions, such as whether college is right for them, and if it is, helps them learn what they can major in and how they can enter the world of work next.

Most importantly, Study Hall allows users to take online courses to earn accredited college credits through ASU. This means that these credits can be counted toward a degree at ASU, or the hundreds of other colleges that recognize ASU-developed programs.

“We looked a lot at what we’re doing on Crash Course and felt really good about it,” Hank Green told BuzzFeed News. “We intentionally said, ‘We make the content, and that’s what we do.’ But the idea presents itself when creating high-quality educational materials. You start to have those ideas about giving people credentials.”

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The project began over three years ago, at an educational event for creators where YouTube Complexly and ASU linked up. The idea came about when the Crash Course team realized that 43 million Americans have some form of student debt, It totaled $1.75 trillion. Of those 43 million people, 40% do not have a degree, because they never graduated. Some may realize part way through their studies that a university education is not for them; For others, life simply gets in the way.

“We decided to look at what were the hardest parts for students, and one of them was the cost barrier and the bureaucratic barrier to higher education,” said Hank Green. He noted that almost anyone can take the courses, including high school students.

Viewers can watch educational videos at Study Hall YouTube channel Free. Then, if they want college credit, they can go to the Study Hall website and purchase access to the entire class, where they will be given coursework and get feedback from faculty. The initial cost of the program is $25, which earns one access to faculty and assessments.

Once someone completes the assessments and gets the grade they want, they can pay $400 toward college credit. Users can choose not to take the credit, which means they only spent $25.

“Fear is a huge roadblock,” Green said. “Getting a little skin in the game is fine with $25, but not how much anyone would think is a lot for a college course. But lowering that initial barrier of paying $1,200 for a course I might fail is important.” Doing four courses and earning at least a B in each entitles the learner to enroll in an official ASU campus or online program.

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Green said he appreciates the fact that ASU does not manipulate college ranking systems in the United States by seeking a low acceptance rate. “A long time ago, they turned that on its head and said, ‘We’re going to judge our school not by who we exclude but by how many people we actually help.’” “This philosophy is really inspiring to me, and it is one of the reasons I was excited to work with them.” Such collaborations are rare, said Green, adding, “I am very precious to my two children.”

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Donald Trump to return to Facebook, Instagram and Meta says

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Meta will restore former President Donald Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts “in the coming weeks,” the company said announce Wednesday. The move comes after two years of social networking banned Trump for praising the rioters who stormed the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.

“The public should be able to hear what politicians are saying so they can make informed decisions,” Nick Clegg, Meta’s president of global affairs, wrote in the company’s announcement.

Trump announced in November 2022 that he would run for president again. His campaign had formally petitioned the Meta to reinstate him on the platform, NBC News said mentioned earlier this month.

Clegg said Trump’s narratives would have “new firewalls to deter repeat offence”. If Trump posts anything that violates Meta’s speech policies, his posts will be removed, and he will be suspended again for anywhere between one month and two years depending on the severity of the violation. Meta may also limit the access of Trump’s posts and prevent their sharing or promotion.

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This is a breaking news story. For updates, check back and fFollow BuzzFeed News on Twitter.



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