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How to beat fake news on your Facebook feed

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just because It’s online doesn’t make it right. It sounds so simple, but if everyone knew it, Facebook and Google wouldn’t have to Pull fake news sites out of their advertising algorithms Nor will people share stories claiming that Donald Trump is a secret lizard or that Hillary Clinton is an Android in a suit pants.

It doesn’t have to be this way. fake news It’s actually really easy to spot – If you know how. Consider this your new guide to media literacy.

Note: When we put this together, we sought the input of two communications experts: Dr.. Melissa ZimdarsAssociate Professor at Merrimack College in Massachusetts its dynamics List of unreliable news sites The virus has spread, and Alexios Manzarlispresident International Fact-Finding Network at the Poynter Institute.

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First, learn about the different types of misleading and false news

1. Fake news

  • These are the easiest to debunk and often come from well-known fake websites designed to look like real news outlets. They may contain misleading images and titles that, at first, appear to be real.
  • 2. Misleading news

  • These are the most difficult to debunk, because they often contain a kernel of truth: a fact, an event, or a quote taken out of its context. Look for interesting titles that are not supported by the information in the article.
  • 3. Too partisan news

  • A type of misinformation, this may be an interpretation of a real news event where facts are manipulated to fit an agenda.
  • 4. Clickbait

  • The shocking or sensational headlines in these stories trick you into clicking for more information — which may or may not live up to what they promised.
  • 5. spelling

  • This is difficult, because irony does not pretend to be real and serves a purpose as a comment or entertainment. But if people are not aware of a parody site, they can share the news as if it was legitimate.
  • Second, hone your fact-checking skills

  • Alexios Manzarlis trains fact-checkers for a living. He says it’s important to have a “healthy amount of skepticism” and think carefully before sharing any news.
  • “If we’re just a little slower in sharing and retweeting content based entirely on the title, we’ll be on a good path toward fighting rumours,” he told CNN.
  • Melissa Zimdars points out that even those who spend a lot of time online are not immune to fake content.
  • “People think so [thinking] “It only applies to seniors,” she told CNN. “I believe that even early education should study communications, media and the Internet. Growing up with the Internet does not necessarily mean that you are an Internet expert.”
  • For starters, here are 10 questions you should ask if something looks fake:

    Zimdar says Websites with strange suffixes Such as “.co” or “.su”, or hosted by third-party platforms such as WordPress, should raise a red flag. Some fake sites, such as National Report, have names that seem legitimate, if not overly generic that can easily deceive people on social sites. For example, several fake reports from abcnews.com.co circulated widely before they were debunked, including an article in June that claimed President Obama had signed an order banning offensive weapons sales.

    Mantzarlis says that one of the biggest reasons fake news spreads on Facebook is that people are drawn to the headline and Don’t bother clicking.

    Just this week, several shady organizations published a story about Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi. “Pepsi stock crashes after CEO tells Trump supporters to ‘take their business elsewhere,’” declared one of the headlines.

    However, the articles themselves did not contain this quote nor evidence that Pepsi’s stock experienced a significant drop (it wasn’t). Nooyi made recorded comments about Trump’s election, But it was never quoted He asks his supporters to “take their business elsewhere.”

    sometimes Legitimate news stories can be distorted and brought to life After years of a wrong mixing of events. Mantzarlis recalls a false story that actually cited a legitimate story from CNNMoney.

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    A blog called Viral Liberty recently reported that Ford has moved production of some of its trucks from Mexico to Ohio due to Donald Trump’s election victory. The story quickly caught on the Internet – after all, it seemed like a big win for the domestic auto industry.

    It turns out that Ford moved some manufacturing from Mexico to Ohio – in 2015. It has absolutely nothing to do with the election results.

    Pictures and videos can also be out of context to support a false claim. In April, the liberal website Occupy Democrats posted a video purporting to show a young woman being pulled out of the bathroom by police because she didn’t look feminine enough. This was during the height of the HB2 “bathroom bill” controversy, and the article clearly linked them both. “IT BEGINS”, read the title.

    However, there was no date on the video or evidence that it was filmed in North Carolina, where the “bathroom bill” was to be passed.

    In fact, According to SnopesThe same video was posted on a Facebook page in 2015, which means it predates the HB2 controversy.

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    It is not only political news that can be fake. Now8News is one of the most famous but seemingly real fake websites that specializes in the kind of weird news stories that often go viral.

    One such article claims that Coca-Cola recalled Dasani water bottles after an “obvious parasite” was found in the water. There was even a sickening accompanying image that allegedly showed the parasite, despite some basic Google searches Reveals that it is most likely a picture of a baby eel.

    Regardless, the article was There is no statement or claim from any company. Obviously this is going to be a big story. Dasani or any number of consumer advocacy groups are going to publish data or news releases about it, right? There is nothing to be found – because the story is 100% fake.

    Other 98%
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    One of the favorite memes of liberal Facebook groups contains a fake Donald Trump quote allegedly from a People Magazine interview in 1998:

    “If I were to run, I would run as a Republican. They’re the dumbest bunch of voters in the country. They believe anything on Fox News. I can lie and they’ll still eat it. I bet my numbers would be great.”

    This is one It can be easily debunked if you take a moment to think about it: People.com has extensive archives, this Quote Nowhere to be found Including.

    During this election season, Pope Francis has been chained up in three hyper-pervasive and outright false stories. According to various (fake) websites, the Pope endorsed three US presidential candidates: First, Bernie Sanders, as “reported” by National Report and USAToday.com.co. Then, Donald Trump, as “reported” by fake news site WTOE 5 News. Finally, another fake news site KYPO6.com reported that it endorsed Hillary Clinton!

    In all of these cases, the subsequent reports were all about the fake reports. It is always good to Trace the story back to the original sourceAnd, if you find yourself in an episode — or if they all lead to the same questionable location — you have reason to be skeptical.

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    Joel Samad/AFP/Chip Somodeville/Getty Images

    Zimdar and Manzarlis say: Confirmation bias is a big reason Fake news like what you do. Part of that is built into Facebook’s algorithm – the more you like or interact with a particular interest, the more Facebook shows you that it’s associated with that interest.

    Likewise, if you hate Donald Trump, you are more likely to believe that negative stories about Donald Trump are true, even if there is no evidence.

    “We are looking for information that actually fits our deep-rooted beliefs,” says Zemdars. “If we come in contact with information we don’t agree with, it may reconfirm us because we will try to find errors.”

    So, if you find a disgraceful article that feels “too good to believe,” be careful: it might be.

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    Did you know that there is actually a file International Fact-Finding Network (who leads Mantzarlis)? And that it has a code of principles? The Code includes the ideals of impartiality and transparency, among others. Sites like FactCheck.org, Snopes, and Politifact adhere to this code, so if you see a debunk there, you know You are getting the real deal. View the full list here.

    This is the place Things can get tough. There is clearly a big difference between “fake” news, which is usually based on reality, and “fake” news, which is just disguised fiction in the form of facts. Now famous Zimdar List It covers both types, plus sarcasm and sites that take advantage of clickbait headlines. Snopes also maintains a list.

    While Zimdars is happy that its list has received a lot of attention, it also cautions that completely deleting some sites as “fakes” is not accurate. “I want to make sure this list doesn’t do too much harm to the end goal,” she says. “It is interesting that some of the headlines [about my list] They are as categorical as the ones I am analyzing.”

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    Screenshots made by an AI director from a fake movie rage Twitter

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    Scofield soon realizes that he is not alone. A small cadre of movie-obsessed artists and artists have harnessed the power of generative AI tools to reimagine classic films – or create entirely new ones – from some of the world’s most iconic names. In December, creator Johnny Darrell went viral Jodorowsky You see, a reimagining of the classic film under the eyes of groundbreaking director Alejandro Jodorowski. Inspired by Darrell, Washington-based Rob Sheridan, former art director of Nine Inch Nails, used artificial intelligence to create Jodorowsky Fraser.

    Sheridan, 42, calls this AI-powered movement “The New Unreal.” Practitioners include a painter based in New Zealand Create a western space on Instagram and a sculptor from Austin, Texas, Making fake sci-fi TV shows. Another content creator from India is using AI image generators to create his own rich font Sci-fi with a Southeast Asian flavor.

    “We’re starting to see this technology as something like a dream engine, leveraging a kind of distorted visual awareness to explore things that never were, never will be, never could be,” Sheridan said. “They hit you in a weird way, because they feel like They are very reasonable.”

    Scofield said he didn’t know why his Cronenberg business was catching fire so quickly. He’s posted several previous experiments on Imgur, Reddit, and Twitter, all of which only got between 50 and 100 likes. “The intention was not to create a clickbait site, but I think it turned into that,” he said. “A lot of people were reposting it and saying, This is terrible. This man does not understand Cronenberg at all.Each time they did, it spread further and incited another wave of criticism, which incited another, and another, and another.

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    Schoefield said the text of his tweet — simply “David Cronenberg’s Galaxy of Flesh (1985)” — could give the false impression that he was trying to deceive Twitter. “There is no real intent behind this title yet, Oh yeah, looks like that could be it,” he said. “But he seemed to really impress people, and I think someone like Cronenberg might be famous enough to have a fanbase.

    He continued, “There are a lot of people who have opinions about what Cronenberg’s aesthetics are and what they are not, and what a bad interpretation of his style is.” He fears that people will think he is trying to reduce Cronenberg’s work to mere physical horror.

    The frames themselves were created by giving Midjourney a “DVD screen” prompt of various scenes from the film The empire strikes. Then it was like: Everything is made of skin, joints, tendons, nerves, umbilical cords, stomach, and arteriesSchofield added.

    Getting a photo creator to make blood was hard — like getting Cronenberg style. “You can’t even write ‘Cronenberg’ in Midjourney,” Scofield said. (Sheridan thinks it’s because of him: He made a series of Cronenberg-inspired photos for the Met Gala in May, and Soon after, the term “Cronenberg” was banned from the tool.)



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    We used AI to write articles about CNET writing with AI

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    Technology news site CNET discovered that he uses artificial intelligence (AI) to write articles about personal finance without any prior advertising or explanation. The articles, which numbered 73, covered topics such as What is Zelle and how does it work?“And it has a small disclaimer at the bottom of every read” This article was created using automation technology and has been carefully edited and fact-checked by an editor on our editorial team. The subheadings in these articles read “CNET Money Staff” generated by artificial intelligence.

    The use of AI to write these articles was first revealed by a Twitter user, and further investigation revealed that the articles had been created using AI since November 2022. The extent and form of AI currently used by CNET is not known as the company did not respond to questions about their use for artificial intelligence.

    The use of AI in journalism raises questions about the transparency and ethics of this practice as well as the potential impact on the veracity and accuracy of news. In addition, it also raises concerns about the implications it may have on SEO and Google searches. The lack of response from CNET regarding their use of AI in writing articles has heightened concerns and sparked a broader discussion about the future of journalism and AI’s role in it.

    Note: This entire article was written by ChatGPT and reviewed by a human editor. (In fact, we had to rewrite the prompt several times to get it to stop throwing real-world errors. Also, CNET did not respond to a human journalist’s request for comment.)

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    Elon Musk has officially lost more private money than anyone else in history

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    Bill Buckner. Justin Guarini. Everyone who “ran” against Vladimir Putin. Now Elon Musk has joined the ranks of the biggest losers in history. the Awarded by the Guinness Book of World Records CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and Twitter, a record-breaking loss of personal wealth. Forbes has estimated that in the past year or so, Musk’s wealth has declined by $182 billion.

    In November 2021, Musk’s wealth peaked at nearly $320 billion, making him the richest man in the world. Most of that, however, was Tesla stock, which has plummeted in value through 2022. His October 2022 purchase of Twitter for $44 billion — which he financed with some of his Tesla stock — also caused a huge buzz in his bottom line.

    In December, Musk’s losses stripped off His top of Forbes existingAnd the title of the richest person in the world went to Bernard Arnault from the LVMH Group, which owns such luxury brands as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Sephora. Forbes noted That many other billionaires will take big losses in 2022, when technology stocks will be hit hard. Jeff Bezos lost $85 billion, and Mark Zuckerberg saw $77 billion of his wealth disappear.

    The previous world record for largest loss of personal wealth was held by Masayoshi Son, CEO of Softbank, who lost more than $59 billion during the dot-com crash of 2000. Today, Son is ranked 67th on Forbes’ list of billionaires.

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