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How pregnancy app data can be used to prosecute abortions

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Many popular reproductive health apps fall short when it comes to protecting users’ data privacy, according to a new report highlighting potential legal risks to people seeking abortions.

After studying 20 of the most popular menstrual and pregnancy tracking apps, researchers from Found the non-profit Mozilla Foundation That 18 of them had data collection practices that raised privacy or security concerns. the report It also looked at five wearables that track fertility but did not raise concerns about their data collection.

Many apps have vague privacy policies that don’t spell out what data can be shared with government agencies or law enforcement, said Gene Caltrider, principal investigator for Mozilla’s “Privacy Not Included” Buyer’s Guide to Connected Consumer Products. Report.

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Ideally, she said, companies would publicly commit to processing data requests from law enforcement by requesting a court order or subpoena before any data is delivered, working to narrow requests as much as possible and alerting users about any requests.

Glow Inc. said. , which makes four of the apps Mozilla has rated as having privacy or security concerns, said in a statement that the company does not share personal data with anyone and will “never sell” user data. The company also said it has a “comprehensive” set of features to protect user data, is subject to an annual privacy and security assessment conducted by a third party, and that employees undergo privacy and security training.

Other companies included in the report reiterated their commitment to data privacy in response to inquiries from The Times. “We will never transfer your private health data to any authority that may use it against you,” Clue, which received an unfavorable rating for privacy and security, said in a statement in May. Apple, whose Apple Watch isn’t classified as a privacy concern, said health data is encrypted when synced with iCloud or when the phone is locked with Face ID, Touch ID or a passcode. Natural Cycles, one of the few apps to receive a favorable rating for privacy and security, said in a statement that the company “has the mindset that every app – even if it has strong privacy protections like us – should work harder to protect data on the user’s behalf.” “

Caitlin Gerdts, vice president of research at Ibis for reproductive health, said the Euki app, which received a positive rating from Mozilla, was based on two years of research into what potential users wanted to see in the sexual and reproductive health app. She said the main concern is privacy and security.

“Privacy and security concerns in reproductive health are not new,” Gerdts said. “Many societies, particularly over-watched and over-watched societies, have had these fears for a long time, and of course now, they’re at the forefront of more people’s minds.”

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The experts said Entering health data into most period tracking apps Not subject to the Health Insurance Transfer and Accountability Act, also known as HIPAA, which regulates how health providers and other entities handle patient data. An opaque privacy policy could mean that users won’t know what data is being shared, with whom and under what circumstances, forcing users to blindly trust a company to protect their information.

“It gets really gray and gets slippery very quickly,” Caltereder said. “It’s really hard to be sure exactly what’s being shared and with whom.”

This may be a concern in states that moved to ban abortion after the Supreme Court reversed the landmark Roe v. Wade decision.

Californians, where abortion remains legal, get some protection through the state’s data privacy laws. California residents have the right to access, delete, and opt out of its sale and sharing of their personal information.

“Health micro apps that collect health information or even a Fitbit app that your doctor tells you to wear may not be covered under HIPAA, but they are more likely to be covered under California law,” said Ashkan Soltani, California executive director of Privacy Protection. The agency, which implements and enforces the state’s consumer privacy laws.

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Starting next year, Californians will have additional protections, such as restrictions on the company’s ability to collect data for purposes other than its main job.

These laws apply only to Californians, not to out-of-state travelers who may come to California to seek abortion. However, Soltani said it may give California consumers who travel to other states additional protection for their data.

In addition to vague privacy policies, the Mozilla report also found that some apps allowed weak passwords or weren’t clear about how they use algorithms to predict ovulation and fertility time frames.

Consumers often want to protect their privacy but don’t know how to protect their privacy or don’t see immediate harm from not doing so, Caltrider said. But as user data monetization continues to increase, consumers should view this as a “tipping point,” she said.

“Last time abortion was illegal, we didn’t have the internet. Digital monitoring was not a factor,” Caltrader said. “It’s too much now. It’s time we really start to consider that there is harm when our privacy is violated.”

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Screenshots made by an AI director from a fake movie rage Twitter

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Scofield soon realizes that he is not alone. A small cadre of movie-obsessed artists and artists have harnessed the power of generative AI tools to reimagine classic films – or create entirely new ones – from some of the world’s most iconic names. In December, creator Johnny Darrell went viral Jodorowsky You see, a reimagining of the classic film under the eyes of groundbreaking director Alejandro Jodorowski. Inspired by Darrell, Washington-based Rob Sheridan, former art director of Nine Inch Nails, used artificial intelligence to create Jodorowsky Fraser.

Sheridan, 42, calls this AI-powered movement “The New Unreal.” Practitioners include a painter based in New Zealand Create a western space on Instagram and a sculptor from Austin, Texas, Making fake sci-fi TV shows. Another content creator from India is using AI image generators to create his own rich font Sci-fi with a Southeast Asian flavor.

“We’re starting to see this technology as something like a dream engine, leveraging a kind of distorted visual awareness to explore things that never were, never will be, never could be,” Sheridan said. “They hit you in a weird way, because they feel like They are very reasonable.”

Scofield said he didn’t know why his Cronenberg business was catching fire so quickly. He’s posted several previous experiments on Imgur, Reddit, and Twitter, all of which only got between 50 and 100 likes. “The intention was not to create a clickbait site, but I think it turned into that,” he said. “A lot of people were reposting it and saying, This is terrible. This man does not understand Cronenberg at all.Each time they did, it spread further and incited another wave of criticism, which incited another, and another, and another.

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Schoefield said the text of his tweet — simply “David Cronenberg’s Galaxy of Flesh (1985)” — could give the false impression that he was trying to deceive Twitter. “There is no real intent behind this title yet, Oh yeah, looks like that could be it,” he said. “But he seemed to really impress people, and I think someone like Cronenberg might be famous enough to have a fanbase.

He continued, “There are a lot of people who have opinions about what Cronenberg’s aesthetics are and what they are not, and what a bad interpretation of his style is.” He fears that people will think he is trying to reduce Cronenberg’s work to mere physical horror.

The frames themselves were created by giving Midjourney a “DVD screen” prompt of various scenes from the film The empire strikes. Then it was like: Everything is made of skin, joints, tendons, nerves, umbilical cords, stomach, and arteriesSchofield added.

Getting a photo creator to make blood was hard — like getting Cronenberg style. “You can’t even write ‘Cronenberg’ in Midjourney,” Scofield said. (Sheridan thinks it’s because of him: He made a series of Cronenberg-inspired photos for the Met Gala in May, and Soon after, the term “Cronenberg” was banned from the tool.)



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We used AI to write articles about CNET writing with AI

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Technology news site CNET discovered that he uses artificial intelligence (AI) to write articles about personal finance without any prior advertising or explanation. The articles, which numbered 73, covered topics such as What is Zelle and how does it work?“And it has a small disclaimer at the bottom of every read” This article was created using automation technology and has been carefully edited and fact-checked by an editor on our editorial team. The subheadings in these articles read “CNET Money Staff” generated by artificial intelligence.

The use of AI to write these articles was first revealed by a Twitter user, and further investigation revealed that the articles had been created using AI since November 2022. The extent and form of AI currently used by CNET is not known as the company did not respond to questions about their use for artificial intelligence.

The use of AI in journalism raises questions about the transparency and ethics of this practice as well as the potential impact on the veracity and accuracy of news. In addition, it also raises concerns about the implications it may have on SEO and Google searches. The lack of response from CNET regarding their use of AI in writing articles has heightened concerns and sparked a broader discussion about the future of journalism and AI’s role in it.

Note: This entire article was written by ChatGPT and reviewed by a human editor. (In fact, we had to rewrite the prompt several times to get it to stop throwing real-world errors. Also, CNET did not respond to a human journalist’s request for comment.)

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Elon Musk has officially lost more private money than anyone else in history

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Bill Buckner. Justin Guarini. Everyone who “ran” against Vladimir Putin. Now Elon Musk has joined the ranks of the biggest losers in history. the Awarded by the Guinness Book of World Records CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and Twitter, a record-breaking loss of personal wealth. Forbes has estimated that in the past year or so, Musk’s wealth has declined by $182 billion.

In November 2021, Musk’s wealth peaked at nearly $320 billion, making him the richest man in the world. Most of that, however, was Tesla stock, which has plummeted in value through 2022. His October 2022 purchase of Twitter for $44 billion — which he financed with some of his Tesla stock — also caused a huge buzz in his bottom line.

In December, Musk’s losses stripped off His top of Forbes existingAnd the title of the richest person in the world went to Bernard Arnault from the LVMH Group, which owns such luxury brands as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Sephora. Forbes noted That many other billionaires will take big losses in 2022, when technology stocks will be hit hard. Jeff Bezos lost $85 billion, and Mark Zuckerberg saw $77 billion of his wealth disappear.

The previous world record for largest loss of personal wealth was held by Masayoshi Son, CEO of Softbank, who lost more than $59 billion during the dot-com crash of 2000. Today, Son is ranked 67th on Forbes’ list of billionaires.

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