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How I learned to love Jazz Fusion, the worst music in the world

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It started innocently enough. One morning I was racing to get the twins to preschool, an endeavor that seems as simple as driving from point A to point B, but in reality (as parents know) tends to resemble a high-pressure race against time in a movie about hostage negotiators. After I packed my nut-free snacks, filled my water bottles, and strapped the twins into the maze car seats despite wasting 30 minutes begging with them for socks, I breathed a sigh of relief and tapped the car radio.

I laughed when I heard the song. So did the twins. After all, the song sounded funny. That’s the thing about jazz fusion: it sounds Ridiculous, and any creature’s central nervous system will recognize it instantly. I can’t remember what the song was. I didn’t imagine myself Wants to remember. It may have been “Mile High” by the Yellowjackets. or “Love on the Road” by Dave Cos. or “PP Head” by Headhunters. Or “The Hideaway” by David Sanborn.

Are you ready to give yourself over to Kenny G’s jazz?

Taylor Hill

All I know is that it came from a wide range of music that I’ve spent my whole life making fun of and trying to avoid.

This does not mean that avoiding it is a viable option in the USA. Jazz fusion envelops us. It washes over us in orthodontist’s offices and malls, in cramped hotel lobbies and gaudyly lit stores. Like a weighted blanket or a waterbed, it’s designed for comfort but only draws attention to its silliness. It’s silky saxophone music played by guys who look like Greg Kinnear. It’s the music that makes the song titles themselves moot because each track is just another synthetic stack of cascading wind chimes, rococo drums, keyboards that seem to have escaped from the secret laboratory of ’80s sitcom theme songs, and bass lines that make popcorn noise pop. Jazz fusion is the only form of secular music in which it would be completely normal for everyone in a band to go out on stage in matching Christmas sweaters. There are millions of people in the world who pay money to go to concerts where jazz is performed, and I will never stop finding it fun.

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But here I was listening to it in the car, and for the first time in my life I didn’t reflexively change the channel.

What’s so strange? I haven’t changed the channel in weeks. I should note that when we rented the car, the only preset station on the radio was WBGO, 88.3 FM, and I left it that way because I don’t have a lot of free time to fiddle with the dashboard and because WBGO offers amazing combos of classic jazz and R&B. What I didn’t realize is that WBGO peppers copious amounts of jazz, especially in the mornings – although I think “pepper” is the wrong word because pepper indicative spices. Anyway, what I find these days is that I dove into the front seat after a mad rush of the car with the twins, started melting in my morning tints of Spyro Gyra and Fourplay, and I Such as He. She.

I really liked it. (And to be clear here: I’m not talking about the genesis of the spiky, funky, early-’70s fusion of jazz with acts like The Weather Report and Miles Davis albums like Brew bitches And the in the corner. That music has always been great – and it just seems to get brighter with each passing year. No, I’m talking about what happened in the aftermath of those sad breakups, when jazz fusion stopped sounding like Miles Davis and started sounding like Mannheim Steamroller.)

For someone like me, someone who has watched the documentary The Velvet Underground three times and has spent decades analyzing every phrase and shaping the many tormented authors (Charlie Parker, Nick Cave, Kurt Cobain, Marvin Gaye, Leonard Cohen, you could probably fill out the rest of the list without my help), this is heresy. I will freak out my 14 year old self. So is my 54-year-old self, and I’m 55. For a while I wondered if it qualifies as one of those “the pandemic changed me” quirks. I always used to hate the dreary monotony of Pink Floyd, for example, but somewhere in the spring of 2020 I started playing The dark side of the moon Over and over again (much to my family’s dismay) and this up All. suddenly. made. sense.

It might be something else. I can’t help but think of my dad and how, back in the 1980s in Southern California, my family would pile into the car to go to church on Sundays, and my dad would double down on our Presbyterian pastorship by running a radio station specializing in what was then called “easy listening” music. I don’t mean easy listening like Lionel Richie songs. I mean easy listening like Percy Faith and Ray Conniff – the now-forgotten bandleaders who churned out the quietest, antiseptic white bread gruel in the history of recorded music. By this time I was already deep into the Clash and Elvis Costello, and was regularly and indignantly asking my dad why we had an auditory lobectomy. He would say, “It relaxes me.”

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I get it now. Why do I give up—and (god help me) a jazz fusion fan when I move my twins into preschool? Because it relaxes me.

The Man Who Dig Dave Koz is a man who digs life.

Stephen J Cohen

I may have been marinating in doom and gloom for too long. It’s refreshing to listen to musicians enjoying their lives and knowing how to play their instruments, from the grating and swaying sounds of things, and not having much to say. It’s nice to play something cute in the car, even when I can still hear my high school English teacher in the ’80s telling me to stay away from the word “cute” because it makes no sense. What is wrong with meaninglessness? What’s awful about cute?

Earlier this year, I watched Penny Lane’s provocative documentary Listen to Kenny G, about the emperor of smooth jazz, and it made me wonder why I’d been such a snob about music for so long. Part of me longed to dismiss all Kenny G fans as philanderers who should listen to real jazz like John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk, yeah, sure, but then again what’s the point of discouraging anyone from listening to music that makes them happy? I don’t understand Kenny G fans, but I kind of envy them. How would it feel to bypass the darkest, most perverse, and saddest forms of musical expression and succumb instead to an upbeat soundtrack of jazz in the supermarket aisle?

Am I going to get progressively happier, too? Calm down with the kids? More confident, even? Because think about it: someone who’s rolling down the street blowing Dave Koz out of his car? This is the person who does not care.

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George RR Martin answers ‘Game of Thrones’ question about Casterly Rock

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Hello, are you there. Yes you! Ever wonder what Casterly Rock looks like? to me George RR MartinThere was “a certain amount of confusion” about the appearance of House Lannister’s ancestral home. Luckily game of thronesFans everywhere, Martin is taking a break from his hard work Winter winds To clarify a question no one is asking.

On his trusted blog, Martin posted a lengthy world-building meditation intended to “relieve” any confusion about Casterly Rock. “A certain amount of confusion” is an awfully slippery term, isn’t it? on condition Thrones Fans at the gates of King’s Landing didn’t exactly chatter about it, and I’ll interpret that to mean “little or nothing.” In the blog post, Martin shared a (very low-res) illustration by Ted Nasmith, whose paintings of Westeros were used in game of thrones Calendars plus files worldbook companion The world of ice and fire. “Ted got every little detail right,” Martin wrote, retracting many of the architectural features Nesmith extracted from his novels. The author continued, “If you look closely, here and there scattered up and down the face of the stand, you can see windows and arrow slits.” It’s impossible to see those features in this adorable photo, so I suppose we’ll have to take his word for it.

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You see, Martin has a bone to pick with how fans imagine this scene. “Lannister Castle is not at the top of the rock,” he asserted. “It’s inside the rock.” Should the man insist on controlling how readers conceive of his worlds within the privacy of their own imagination? What does it matter – and how does any of this criticism bring him closer to ending the series once and for all? Martin seems to acknowledge the futility of this blog post, writing, “What does all this mean? Probably nothing. I just wanted to set the record straight. Give you everything to think about.” (And maybe put an end to all these pictures of a little rock with a castle on top .)”

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The author notes that his novels never pay a proper visit to Casterly Rock; Although the Lannister stronghold has been mentioned hundreds of times, as well as glimpses through characters’ flashbacks, it never really puts the story there in the proper timeline. But maybe it will change. “I hope Casterly Rock doesn’t stay offstage forever,” he wrote. “I have two more novels, and my plan is to have one or more of my point-of-view characters visit The Rock Inn Winter winds or Spring dreamso that I may show you all the wonders, horrors, and treasures of House Lannister first hand.”

At this point, he’s just teasing us, right? Hey George – While things rest, do them Winter winds Next!

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Bill Cosby reveals he’s considering comedy tour plans for 2023

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sound Bill Cosby Ready to join The Comedy Circle. On Wednesday, host WGH spoke “yes” When asked if he plans to tour again in 2023.

“Yes. Yes. Because there is so much fun I can have in telling this story,” Cosby said. “Years ago, maybe 10 years ago, I found it better to say it than to write it.”

The 85-year-old was convicted of criminal sexual assault in April 2018. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court then overturned the conviction in 2021. In June, he made a post on Instagram celebrating his one-year release date.

Bell wrote, “After 2 years and 10 months of fighting for my life and the truth, it feels like one year of freedom at home with my family (at least that’s what my wife says).”

However, the assault accusations are persistent. In early December, five women submitted a new application sexual assault lawsuit against Bill Cosby and NBC. Four women, filed in New York, said Cosby forced them to have sex or raped them between the 1980s and 1990s. The fifth woman says Cosby raped her in 1969. Comedian Andrew White called the suit “frivolous.”

Wyatt too confirmed to diverse That the former actor’s plans to tour are legit. He said that Cosby “Consider spring/summer to start touring.”

The tour can also be a response to Compensation award of $500,000 Cosby owes a debt to Judy Huth. Judy won a civil case against Bell in June, accusing him of sexually assaulting her when she was 16 years old in 1975.

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At the time of the ruling, White Hoth said “I will never be paid by Mr. Cosby.” He also alleged that Huth owed her legal team more than $3 million, which Jodie’s attorney, Gloria Allred, later denied.

“Mr. Cosby’s spokesperson appears to be trying to wring victory from the jaws of Mr. Cosby’s massive defeat. Ms. Huth has no legal bills for fees with my law firm.”

Twitter users react to Bill Cosby’s contemplative tour of the year 2023

After Cosby’s surprise announcement, people on Twitter started flocking to him. The tweets highlighted multiple angles, from congratulations to ticket sales, cancel culture, and his “boldness” — in light of accusations that have reportedly come from more than 50 women since 2005.




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See the first photos of Alyssa Scott and Nick Cannon’s baby

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Nick Cannon welcomes baby number 12

Alyssa Scott And the Nick CannonNewborn daughter had pink arrival.

the husband They welcomed their second child– A girl named Hello Mary Cannon—December 14, Alyssa announced December 29 on Instagram. Now, the model offers more behind-the-scenes looks at Halo’s birth, as well as the adorable first photos of her daughter.

In the glimpseHalo is seen sleeping on a white blanket, while wearing a comfy jumpsuit with a flowery headband. There is a bunch of flowers wrapped in an icy cone next to her, as well as a sparkling crown. To complete the enchanting image, an abundant bouquet of pink roses was placed atop Halo’s head.

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Alyssa, who is also the mother of a 4-year-old daughter Zilla From a previous relationship, the post captioned, “HI BABY!! 12/14/22.”

More photos on her Instagram Story show a close-up of a halo among roses and a TikTok of the newborn sleeping while the photographer captured it in holiday-themed photos.



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