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California lawmakers pass new social media protections for minors

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California lawmakers have passed legislation designed to protect the privacy and welfare of minors on social media and protect them from fraudsters and commercial exploitation on online platforms.

Lawmakers also approved a bill requiring platforms including Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube and Google to publicly disclose their policies on how content is screened, a requirement aimed at combating the spread of hate, racism, extremist violence and conspiracy theories online. .

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The state House passed bills AB 2273 and AB 587, on Tuesday, a day after they entered the Senate with strong bipartisan support. The proceedings now go to Governor Gavin Newsom for consideration.

“Our children are bombarded with information online and they don’t yet have the ability to make sense of all that information coming to them,” Assemblyman Buffy Weeks (D-Oakland) said before Tuesday’s vote. “We want to make sure that when we create these products, they are by design and virtually safe for our children.”

Wicks is the primary sponsor of AB 2273, the California age-appropriate design law, which prohibits technology companies from using any children’s personal information in a way that is harmful to their physical or mental health. Web platforms likely to be used by children may be required to enact data privacy measures such as making user settings high privacy by default, describing privacy policies in language that children can understand and prohibiting the use of children’s personal information for any purpose other than the purpose for which it was initially collected.

“As a parent, you don’t have a chance under the status quo. You don’t have a chance. There are things running in the background. There are things that affect your children’s minds, and their brain development, that you cannot control.” Society member Jordan Cunningham (R-Paso Robles) said: “Most parents are not software engineers.” “I can tell you as a former attorney general, there are predators out there, and they use these tools to try to get to the kids. It’s not true, and it’s time for tech companies to step up.”

A coalition of technology groups, including Entertainment Software Assn, opposed. legislation. In a statement to lawmakers, they said enforcement of the law on websites “that a child could potentially access” was too broad and would affect far more sites and platforms than necessary.

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The News/Media Alliance, an industry advocacy group, has the Los Angeles Times on its board and sits on its board California Times President Chris Argentieri has Paid to make changes to the invoice Because of concerns that it might make it more expensive to publish news online.

Jenny Raditzky, a developmental behavioral pediatrician and assistant professor at the University of Michigan Medical School, told lawmakers in March that most web platforms are designed by adults untrained in the ways that children experience the digital world. She said that designers often focus on monetization or engagement tactics — attracting users by offering “rewards” for watching ads or finding ways to make it difficult to navigate off the site — and don’t think about the unintended negative consequences for children.

“We have found that design standards for adults are negligently copied and pasted into children’s digital products,” she said.

TikTok, Pinterest, Twitter, Twitch, LinkedIn and Discord did not respond to requests for comment on whether they support the Code of Design code, how it would affect them, and if there were any changes they would like to see. Google, the owner of YouTube, and Snap, the owner of Snapchat, also did not respond. Reddit, Tumblr, and Yelp all declined to comment.

A spokesperson for Meta – the parent company of Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp – noted the company “Best interests of the child frameas a guide to how the company can build “age-appropriate experiences” for young users. The speaker also cited several features of the platform that protect young users, including one where teen accounts are set to private by default and another where advertisers can only use age, gender, and location to target Teens with ads.

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“On Instagram, we test validation tools… which allows us to offer age-appropriate experiences to people on our platform,” a Meta spokesperson said in an email to The Times. “We also use artificial intelligence to understand if someone is a teenager or an adult.”

Mark Weinstein, Founder Alternative Social Media Platform MeWe – a small Facebook competitor she has Flirt users who feel they are being censored by the larger platform – said the Design Code Act “is an important step forward in protecting our children’s privacy and critical thinking abilities”.

“Currently mainstream social media companies are brainwashing and addicting our children,” he wrote via email. “This work is considered and necessary due to the frenzy-biased nature of social media companies whose unethical focus is solely on revenue.”

The bill also found support from one of the loudest voices in the growing chorus of social media criticism: Frances Hogan, a Facebook product manager turned whistleblower last fall A set of internal company documents were leaked To Congress, the US Securities and Exchange Commission, and The Wall Street Journal.

Material in Haugen’s “Facebook Profiles” included an internal discussion among Meta employees about the company’s contribution to several social ills, including mental health issues, among teenage Instagram users. (The company asserts that its documents have been falsified.)

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The Haugen leaks sparked and spurred a renewed wave of criticism on Facebook In the eyes of the public. She has since used her platform to advocate for a handful of political efforts to regulate internet companies more stringently, including the Design Code Act. In April, she said sat on the board To discuss children’s online safety with state legislators in Sacramento.

Although the documents you leak covered wide area From problem areasincluding online misinformation and political extremism, Haugen said she was not surprised that it was the effects on children that caught the attention of lawmakers.

“The solutions to many of the problems described in my disclosures are very complex,” she told The Times in May. But “when it comes to kids, it’s really simple.”

In the wake of the Haugen leaks, Meta has halted development of a pre-teen-oriented Instagram Kids app that would have been ad-free and with an age-appropriate design. The company, which initially presented the project as a way to capture children who would join Instagram by lying about their ages, announced in September that it would take a step back and discuss the proposed product with parents and other stakeholders before moving forward.

Key aspects of the legislation passed by state lawmakers on Tuesday were modeled on data protection and privacy restrictions already adopted in Europe. For example, Wicks said, in the UK, Google has made SafeSearch the default browsing mode for anyone under 18, YouTube has turned off autoplay for underage users, and TikTok and Instagram have disabled direct messaging between children and adults.

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Under Wicks’ law, the California attorney general can take civil action against businesses that don’t follow the law, including fines of up to $7,500 per child for each violation.

State lawmakers have also approved AB 587, which will require social media companies to publicly post their Terms of Service — the policies that define permitted, prohibited and controlled behavior and activities — and report that information to the state attorney general.

Assembly member Jesse Gabriel (Dim Encino), the bill’s sponsor, said it aims to curb the spread of extremism, racism and conspiracy theories across social media.

“Keep in mind the recent mass shootings we’ve seen in this country,” he said. “One of the themes: They were extremists, often with a toxic mixture of white supremacy and extremist ideology.”

On Tuesday, Gabriel also criticized the country’s major web platforms, most of which are located in California, saying that they “killed us every step of the way.”

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Given California’s influence on nationwide politics, Gabriel and Weeks have suggested that other states — and Congress — might use child protection and transparency requirements in legislation as a model for adopting their own laws. If billing becomes a law, Facebook, Google, and other web platforms may also enact nationwide restrictions and protections.

“Would you have a different set of regulations for children in California than those in Nevada? No, you could just create a standard that you would stick to across the board,” Weeks said.

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Screenshots made by an AI director from a fake movie rage Twitter

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Scofield soon realizes that he is not alone. A small cadre of movie-obsessed artists and artists have harnessed the power of generative AI tools to reimagine classic films – or create entirely new ones – from some of the world’s most iconic names. In December, creator Johnny Darrell went viral Jodorowsky You see, a reimagining of the classic film under the eyes of groundbreaking director Alejandro Jodorowski. Inspired by Darrell, Washington-based Rob Sheridan, former art director of Nine Inch Nails, used artificial intelligence to create Jodorowsky Fraser.

Sheridan, 42, calls this AI-powered movement “The New Unreal.” Practitioners include a painter based in New Zealand Create a western space on Instagram and a sculptor from Austin, Texas, Making fake sci-fi TV shows. Another content creator from India is using AI image generators to create his own rich font Sci-fi with a Southeast Asian flavor.

“We’re starting to see this technology as something like a dream engine, leveraging a kind of distorted visual awareness to explore things that never were, never will be, never could be,” Sheridan said. “They hit you in a weird way, because they feel like They are very reasonable.”

Scofield said he didn’t know why his Cronenberg business was catching fire so quickly. He’s posted several previous experiments on Imgur, Reddit, and Twitter, all of which only got between 50 and 100 likes. “The intention was not to create a clickbait site, but I think it turned into that,” he said. “A lot of people were reposting it and saying, This is terrible. This man does not understand Cronenberg at all.Each time they did, it spread further and incited another wave of criticism, which incited another, and another, and another.

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Schoefield said the text of his tweet — simply “David Cronenberg’s Galaxy of Flesh (1985)” — could give the false impression that he was trying to deceive Twitter. “There is no real intent behind this title yet, Oh yeah, looks like that could be it,” he said. “But he seemed to really impress people, and I think someone like Cronenberg might be famous enough to have a fanbase.

He continued, “There are a lot of people who have opinions about what Cronenberg’s aesthetics are and what they are not, and what a bad interpretation of his style is.” He fears that people will think he is trying to reduce Cronenberg’s work to mere physical horror.

The frames themselves were created by giving Midjourney a “DVD screen” prompt of various scenes from the film The empire strikes. Then it was like: Everything is made of skin, joints, tendons, nerves, umbilical cords, stomach, and arteriesSchofield added.

Getting a photo creator to make blood was hard — like getting Cronenberg style. “You can’t even write ‘Cronenberg’ in Midjourney,” Scofield said. (Sheridan thinks it’s because of him: He made a series of Cronenberg-inspired photos for the Met Gala in May, and Soon after, the term “Cronenberg” was banned from the tool.)



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We used AI to write articles about CNET writing with AI

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Technology news site CNET discovered that he uses artificial intelligence (AI) to write articles about personal finance without any prior advertising or explanation. The articles, which numbered 73, covered topics such as What is Zelle and how does it work?“And it has a small disclaimer at the bottom of every read” This article was created using automation technology and has been carefully edited and fact-checked by an editor on our editorial team. The subheadings in these articles read “CNET Money Staff” generated by artificial intelligence.

The use of AI to write these articles was first revealed by a Twitter user, and further investigation revealed that the articles had been created using AI since November 2022. The extent and form of AI currently used by CNET is not known as the company did not respond to questions about their use for artificial intelligence.

The use of AI in journalism raises questions about the transparency and ethics of this practice as well as the potential impact on the veracity and accuracy of news. In addition, it also raises concerns about the implications it may have on SEO and Google searches. The lack of response from CNET regarding their use of AI in writing articles has heightened concerns and sparked a broader discussion about the future of journalism and AI’s role in it.

Note: This entire article was written by ChatGPT and reviewed by a human editor. (In fact, we had to rewrite the prompt several times to get it to stop throwing real-world errors. Also, CNET did not respond to a human journalist’s request for comment.)

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Elon Musk has officially lost more private money than anyone else in history

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Bill Buckner. Justin Guarini. Everyone who “ran” against Vladimir Putin. Now Elon Musk has joined the ranks of the biggest losers in history. the Awarded by the Guinness Book of World Records CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and Twitter, a record-breaking loss of personal wealth. Forbes has estimated that in the past year or so, Musk’s wealth has declined by $182 billion.

In November 2021, Musk’s wealth peaked at nearly $320 billion, making him the richest man in the world. Most of that, however, was Tesla stock, which has plummeted in value through 2022. His October 2022 purchase of Twitter for $44 billion — which he financed with some of his Tesla stock — also caused a huge buzz in his bottom line.

In December, Musk’s losses stripped off His top of Forbes existingAnd the title of the richest person in the world went to Bernard Arnault from the LVMH Group, which owns such luxury brands as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Sephora. Forbes noted That many other billionaires will take big losses in 2022, when technology stocks will be hit hard. Jeff Bezos lost $85 billion, and Mark Zuckerberg saw $77 billion of his wealth disappear.

The previous world record for largest loss of personal wealth was held by Masayoshi Son, CEO of Softbank, who lost more than $59 billion during the dot-com crash of 2000. Today, Son is ranked 67th on Forbes’ list of billionaires.

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